Snowfall in Gloucester January 24, 2023

Gloucester 1/24/2023: Yellow and gray streaked sky, roads clear, and light accumulation from yesterday’s snowfall. Despite the sunny and warming up that’s forecast, there should be enough snow when school lets out suitable for building a snowman and slow sledding!

Edward Hopper & Cape Ann: Exhibition Coming to Cape Ann Museum opens July 22 #GloucesterMA

Finally! A major exhibition of Hopper’s Gloucester is underway, and one that will be mounted right here in Gloucester. Mark your calendars for visits to Cape Ann Museum this summer to study up close 60 Edward Hopper paintings, drawings and prints inspired by Gloucester and Cape Ann, on loan from the Whitney Museum of American Art and other public and private collections, and featuring a selection of work by Josephine Nivinson Hopper.

Masterpiece drawings are rarely on public view or loaned because 1)they are fragile and watercolors are especially susceptible to light damage and 2)they can be a fixture highlight of a permanent collection which does not warrant any absence easily. This gathering of Hopper originals inspired by Gloucester at the Cape Ann Museum will truly be a once in a generation or lifetime opportunity to see the drawings on view and together in one venue. Investments and improvements into Cape Ann Museum facilities undertaken during Ronda Faloon’s tenure as former Director improved conditions so much that the museum can secure and protect temporary loans of such significance.

Edward Hopper & Cape Ann: Illuminating an American Landscape is on view at CAM this summer 2023. Opening on July 22, Hopper’s birthday, exactly 100 years after his pivotal trip to Gloucester (then celebrating its 300th anniversary), this once-in-a-generation exhibition offers a fresh look at one of America’s best-known artists at the crucial moment that profoundly shaped his art and his life. It shows the largely ignored but significant origin story of Hopper’s years in and around Gloucester, Massachusetts—a period and place that imbued Hopper’s paintings with a clarity and purpose that had eluded his earlier work. The success of Hopper’s Gloucester watercolors transformed his work in all media and set the stage for his monumental career.”

Cape Ann Museum read more here

Edward Hopper (1882-1967) earned respect from his colleagues since his student days and ‘world famous artist’ status in his own time. Admiration for his contribution to American 20th century art did not fade in the 21st century. Indeed it’s been supercharged. Dr. Elliot Bostwick Davis, a long time curator and former museum director, was brought in to lead the survey at Cape Ann Museum, and its accompanying catalogue, published by Rizzoli, the preeminent art publishing house, with a foreword by Adam Weinberg and available in May. Davis was part of the curatorial team that produced the major 2007 Hopper exhibit for the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston which traveled to the Art Institute of Chicago and National Gallery. Significant Hopper artworks are on permanent display and revered worldwide. One imagines that Davis’s efforts were certain to secure the loans Cape Ann Museum sought, and perhaps a future Hopper bequest for the museum. As an art dealer, I first met Dr. Davis when she was an assistant curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art when Colta Ives was the director of the print department.

I determined that there are more than 120 Edward Hopper works of art inspired by Gloucester, and mapped them which helped with the walking tour developed at Cape Ann Museum years after and was credited in CAM’s brochure. Less than 30 had been identified and some were credited to locations elsewhere in Massachusetts or out of state.

Publishers back in 2010 and 2012 did not think there was enough of a market for a Gloucester focused Hopper monograph. Good Morning Gloucester did and was the first to publish that research. In the past decade, Hopper surveys–whether narrow in focus, a broad retrospective traveling in the United States and abroad, or a viral social media expression during the pandemic–have been blockbusters and relevant, inspiring bequests, discoveries, and original work by filmmakers, playwrights, authors and musicians. It’s Gloucester’s time!

Edward Hopper, House in the Italian Quarter, 1923, watercolor, Smithsonian.

“#16 Fort Square Road, Gloucester, MA. Turn around with your back to Gloucester harbor and face “Tony’s House” at the angle shown here. In the painting, note the hint of  city skyline lower left, and the slight  slope along the right of the harbor. The double house and outhouses were irresistible and inevitable subjects.”

Catherine Ryan, 2010. Update: Shingles gone. The home was for sale in 2020, sold, and renovated. Blue cladding is recent. Photo with snow 1/24/2023. Note Birdseye in 2010 photos where Beauport Hotel is now.

The cover for the new catalogue features this home on Washington Street. The painting is in private hands, part of a wonderful collection in New York advised by fantastic curators associated with the Whitney. After this exhibit at Cape Ann Museum perhaps an eventual bequest here in Gloucester could happen.

Annisquam As You Like It candlelight masque & listening party


Jane Deering shares news about an upcoming special event:

Save the date January 21, 2023!

As You Like It: candlelight masque & listening party with Lanes Coven Theater and new music by Scott Moore

As You Like It brings a newly-composed score to the Annisquam Village Church on Saturday,
January 21, 2023 at 7pm. Artist-in-Residence Scott Moore created the eclectic large-scale work
throughout the spring and summer, playing and recording every instrument himself. The music
brings to life the forms and gestures of Shakespeare’s beloved pastoral comedy with a fun, fresh
pastiche of styles and sounds—from absurd, neo-Baroque strings and harpsichord, to hip-hop
drums and impressionist dream folk. Originally commissioned by the Louisville (KY) Ballet, and
premiered as a ballet in August, the piece has been substantially reworked to include dialogue
from the play, delivered live by Gloucester’s rising theater stars, Lanes Coven. Conversation with
the composer will chronicle the journey from conception to premiere, illuminating the artistic
process and framing the evening’s performance. A feast for the ears and the mind, this unusual
and enchanting evening will also feature light refreshment. All are welcome; donations are
gratefully accepted, and will benefit the AVC music program.

Annisquam Village Church, 820 Washington Street, Gloucester MA 01930

tune in 7 days: Cape Ann Symphony Annual Meeting

Cape Ann Symphony Orchestra, Inc.

Notice of the upcoming Annual Meeting

Wednesday, January 18, 2023 at 7:00 pm

via Zoom

The Annual Meeting of the Cape Ann Symphony Orchestra, Inc. will be held on Wednesday, January 18, 2023, at 7:00 pm. The purpose of this meeting is to hear reports of the past year’s activity by the Music Director, President, Treasurer, Manager and Board Officers. The meeting is also convened to elect Directors and Officers for the period from January 19, 2023 through January 18, 2024. All regular patrons of the Cape Ann Symphony are welcome to attend. The meeting will be held via Zoom conference. To receive a Zoom invitation to attend please send an email to info@capeannsymphony.org. Enter “Annual Meeting” in the subject line and include in the email your desire to attend the meeting and an email address so that you can receive a Zoom invite. For further information please contact Cape Ann Symphony at 978-281-0543.

MLK DAY, January 16, 2023

From Kathleen Williams, thank you for always keeping us informed.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 6, 2023

CELEBRATION OF MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR DAY JANUARY 16 WITH INTERNATIONALLY ACCLAIMED CARTOONIST KEITH KNIGHT
The Gloucester Meetinghouse Foundation celebrates the 2023 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with a free event Monday, January 16 at 2:00 p.m. at the Gloucester Meetinghouse at the corner of Middle and Church Streets.

The Gloucester Meetinghouse Foundation hosts cartoonist, rapper, social activist, author, and educator, Keith Knight, creator of The Knight Life, K Chronicles, (Th)ink, and co-creator of the television series Woke.  Through his art, Knight raises topics of race and identity with edge and humor to foster civic dialogue and raise awareness of racial illiteracy. His work is published worldwide, and features Knight’s candid take on current events as they relate to race relations in the United States.

Born in Malden, Massachusetts and a graduate of Salem State University, Knight’s work has earned him the highest professional accolades. He is the recipient of the Harvey Kurtzman Award, the industry’s most respected award for the best syndicated strip or panel weekly. He is also the recipient of the 2015 NAACP History Maker Award.

Following Mr. Knight’s slideshow presentation, members of the audience will have an opportunity to interact with him through a Q&A segment and roundtable discussion.

For the past six years, GMF has celebrated the life of Martin Luther King, Jr. with a free event to bring together the Cape Ann community and raise awareness of the historical, cultural, musical, and artistic contributions of African Americans.

The Gloucester Meetinghouse Foundation is grateful for the individuals and organizations that have made this program possible:
John and Mollie Byrnes, Susan Gray, Action, Inc., Beverly and Addison Gilbert Hospitals, a Member of Beth Israel Lahey Health, the Gloucester Racial Justice Team, and the Manship Artists Residency. Technical support is provided by the Cape Ann Community Cinema.

ABOUT THE GLOUCESTER MEETINGHOUSE FOUNDATION
Founded in 2015, the Gloucester Meetinghouse Foundation is dedicated to preserving the landmark building as a civic hub, entertainment venue, and community center. In addition to its work to preserve the historic 1806 Meetinghouse, GMF is currently raising funds to restore Meetinghouse Green.
The GMF has received a $130,000 grant from the Community Preservation Act and a $2,000 grant from the Essex Heritage Partnership Grant Program towards a total project goal of $340,000. Construction is scheduled to begin in spring 2023. For more information, a full schedule of upcoming concerts and events, and to sign up for the GMF newsletter, visit www.gloucestermeetinghouse.org.

We thank the sponsors of the Gloucester Meetinghouse Foundation’s 2022-2023 Autumn, Winter, Spring Concert and Event Series:
GUARANTOR: Woodie Brock, Patricia Roach & Robert Martin, Scobie Ward
PLATINUM: Anonymous, Peter Calkins & Susan Casey, Linzee Coolidge
GOLD: J.J. & Jackie Bell, John & Janis Bell, Karen Bell, Cape Ann Savings Bank, Andrew Spindler & Hiram Butler
SILVER: JoeAnn Hart & Gordon Baird, Charles Nazarian, Patricia Poore
BRONZE: Beth Graham & William Schulz, Sandra & John Ronan, Holly Tanguay, Sarah Willwerth-Dyer and Michael Dyer
SPECIAL THANKS: Massachusetts Cultural Council, Essex County Community Foundation

 

Stepping into 2023 on a clear and sunny New Year’s Day. Walking in #GloucesterMA

Picnics, promenade, and polar plunge- there were fresh starts everywhere we turned.

Photos: Gloucester, Ma. New Year’s Day, 2023. Coffin’s Beach, Long Beach, Good Harbor Beach, Niles Beach, Stacy Boulevard, and Wingaersheek Beach.

Join in planning now for #GloucesterMA 400th Anniversary in 2023!

All are invited to have fun, join in, share ideas for Gloucester’s 400th Anniversary possible celebrations in 2023. A public meeting will be held at City Hall on Saturday, April 28, 2018 from 1-3pm. Can’t attend? Email your input to the 400th steering committee: email gloucester400@gmail.com  and check out the 400th Anniversary Facebook page For More Info

“Although Gloucester’s 400th Anniversary is five years away, we know that those years will go by quickly.  400 years deserves a year long celebration in 2023 and a steering committee has been meeting for the last six or seven months to get the process started. Three Captains have been chosen to lead the group:  Bruce Tobey, Bob Gillis and Ruth Pino. The Committee is sponsoring a public meeting on Saturday April 28, 2018 in City Hall Auditorium…What should happen during 2023? What would you participate in? What would you miss if it didn’t happen?” 

With so much advance notice, it’s fun to ruminate. Three words come quickly to mind for one idea: Virginia Lee Burton. Burton was one of the most influential children’s book author-illustrators of the 20th century and Folly Cove textile designer and founder. She received the Caldecott medal in 1943 for The Little House. Whether for the 400th Anniversary or not, I hope one day that there are tribute commissions for Virginia Lee Burton’s beloved characters Katy from Katy and the Big Snow and Mary Ann from Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel at Stage Fort playground.  Life Story and Song of Robin Hood were also informed by landscape and her life in Gloucester. (The Burton tributes could be massive, interactive and accessible bronze sculptures. Tom Otterness commissions were completed at this scale. Why not Burton? They don’t have to be. Also bring back the monumental sea serpent and the big truck. These memorable imaginative expressions were wood in the past and maintained for years. Perhaps they could be recreated with modern decking materials. And add in Burton’s Little House! )

 

Archives

May 1923 Gloucester Daily Times covers down to the wire plans tercentenary Gloucester Mass.jpg

Gloucester has a history of producing major anniversary celebrations which makes looking back through archives* inspiring for future plans. Here are a few I’ve pulled:

*digitizing Gloucester Daily Times and Gloucester’s municipal archives is another oft repeated plea of mine and others–am sending that one along to a 400th dream wish list…

1892

Link to Gloucester’s 250th memorial celebration BOOK: https://archive.org/stream/memorialofcelebr00glou

1942

August 16, 1942– the city’s second (!) Tercentenary Celebration.

 

1923 Fighting for public art –  the Fisherman at the Wheel memorial commission

On May 21, 1923, the Gloucester Daily Times published an article about the appropriations and planning for the city’s 300th Anniversary which is remarkable in content and its late date–the celebration was just months away!  The idea itself and related costs concerning a public art commission –the one that would become Gloucester’s renowned Fisherman at the Wheel Memorial– were hammered out at a heated City Council meeting. Here’s the nearly complete transcription:

COUNCIL RECONSIDERS AND VOTES $5000 TO CELEBRATION: Equal Amount Will Be Reserved for Permanent Memorial Fund–Executive Committee Held Prolonged and Animated Session Saturday Evening. May 21, 1923 (*note ______ indicates illegible copy)

After three hours of discussion and a conference of the municipal council behind closed doors lasting about three-quarters of an hour on Saturday evening, it was voted to reconsider their action whereby the $10,000 appropriated for the anniversary committee should be alloted for a permanent memorial and voted for _____ committee to expend a sum not exceeding $5000 for the celebration, and the other $5000 to be used for the creation of a permanent memorial.

The agreement as finally reached is ______________ provide for the dedication in whole or in part of a permanent memorial to be erected and paid for jointly by the _______ city of Gloucester. “The municipal council agrees that a sum of $5000 of the amount appropriated by the city for the celebration will be for the general purposes of the committee if necessary, with the understanding that all expensea for additional police protection incurred by the  committee on public safety will be paid for by the anniversary committee. And with the further understanding that the anniversary committee will do all possible to have this sum of money applied to the permanent memorial in addition to the sum reserved ____ by the municipal _____ surplus after the celebration is over, this surplus also to be for the purpose of a permanent memorial.” The meeting opened at 8.15 o’clock, with a reading of the records by Secretary Harold H. Parsons, and following this there came without hesitation_____ ing of the celebration from those present, and for a time, one was reminded of the old town meeting days. ___________ A Piatt Andrew ___________ carnival parade by members of the art colony of the city were accepted and adopted. 

Plain Talk by Chairman Barrett-  Chairman Barrett then arose and addressed the members present and said: “I sent a communication to the municipal council some time ago to find out just what standing this celebration had with them. The letter I received was not

Continue reading “Join in planning now for #GloucesterMA 400th Anniversary in 2023!”