A smile path helps wildlife.

Walk around or pause if you can. We’re lucky to have tiny shorebirds visit beaches during fall migration.

Deborah Cramer describes impact of shorebird disturbances (specifically to red knots)

(Red knots) “feed amid congestion, constantly interrupted by the commotion of off-road vehicles, dogs and people. Forced to take flight repeatedly, they lose precious refueling time. Minutes lost during one ebb tide on one day accumulate into hour upon hour as the season continues. So many times I’d walk the beaches at home, unconsciously flushing flocks of sandpipers at the tide line, taking pleasure as they circled out over the water and then landed farther down the beach, never thinking that disturbing them might make a difference.” 

Deborah Cramer The Narrow Edge

photo below: Sanderlings, semipalmated plovers and semipalmated sandpipers dashing along Long Beach 9/22/2020. Dogs rushing at the birds flush them 100%. Wider smile path with your pet can really help. Ditto looking ahead before tossing a ball inadvertently in the direction of a flock. They’re hard to see. If you spot them and have time, pause to enjoy the tiny touch down marvels. The increase August-October is migration.

The Morning After- next day storm waves

The Long Beach walkway was dry this morning: Storm Teddy did not surge up and over the seawall. Light debris was deposited on nearly spotless Long Beach. Beautiful rollers were distant as the tide was heading out.

photos 9/23/2020- click to enlarge to full size

 

 

Spotted less than ten shorebirds, three species. These tiny birds are migrating from the arctic and landing to rest and refuel. Give them space if you see them! The few I spotted were flushed off.

A smile path helps wildlife. Walk around (or pause if you have the time)

 

Shorebird visitors hanging out together today (sanderlings, semipalmated sandpipers and semipalmated plovs). Easy to add a smile path when you spot them.

 

Below L-R: Sanderlings, semipalmated sandpipers, and semipalmated plover visiting 2020

 

Scenes of waves from Storm Teddy yesterday 9/22/2020 here

Essex National Heritage Trails & Sails 2020 FREE fun events start Friday September 18th! Plan ahead

The Essex National Heritage Fall annual meeting is this Thursday, September 17, 2020 at 9AM — and it’s virtual so more people can RSVP than ever. The next day, Trails and Sails 2020 is back! Two fun three day weekends packed with FREE activities.

News from Essex National Heritage:

Discover special places in your backyard from Friday September 18 – through Sunday September 27, 2020!

Be guided through unique landscapes on land and sea, virtually explore historic properties, and take in experiences of all kinds. Find what makes Essex County like nowhere else during the annual two weekends of Trails & Sails. Event styles this year include: DIY Virtual Experiences; self-guided tours; tours by car; scavenger hunts; small group events; and arts and cultural activities and experiences…and so much more!

SEE upcoming trails & Sails events here (updated continually)

Trails and Sails 2020,

Essex National Heritage,

Manchester Historical museum will be offering self guided tours: Download your choice of 3 self guided walking tours in the downtown area of Manchester-by-the-Sea from the Manchester Historical Museum website

Meanwhile Ipswich Marini Farm is featuring a farm forest ice cream hike.


There are no Rockport or Gloucester listings that I see- however, the Sargent House Museum is offering walking tours downtown September 26, October 3, 10, and 17 to sites and historic buildings associated with Judith Sargent Murray. It’s not too late for the museum to add the Sept. 26th one into the mix of free events for Trails & Sails 2020, or folks to plan “while you’re at it” activities. (Perhaps they’ll waive the $10 on that day for Trails & Sails participants?) The HarborWalk is open!

NEW Maplewood School apartment and town house condos are so loft-like soaring big and bright! Beautiful historic building #GloucesterMA

There will be 12 brand new homes for sale within the former Maplewood School, renamed the “Maplewood School Residences” at 120 Maplewood Avenue. Open houses began last week, offering sneak peek access and sales for buyers eager to preview the thoughtful and modern layouts designed into this beautiful and historic Gloucester building. The Maplewood School Residences project has reached the exciting studs out stage for its interior raw spaces.  A model unit **still under construction** was made available for walk through.

 The school was built in 1899. Here are some BEFORE exterior photographs from 2016 when the building was on the market and from 2018 (when demo and major structural upgrades commenced) compared with AFTER photographs from February and September 2020.

BEFORE  | AFTER 

 

a few more BEFORE exterior and interior photographs

 

AFTER photographs interior and exterior details from 2020

– construction in progress

Original architectural features were restored and incorporated throughout. The space plans and configurations are stunning and creative. And big! The smallest two bedroom unit is a large and airy 1600 sf’. Every unit in the Maplewood School residences features classic design elements like generous entries that will make it a pleasure to come home to. How exciting to see this long term project come to life!

 

Cranes will be on site as early next week to facilitate delivery of granite counter tops and hardwood flooring for the upper floors. Some of the listings include extra outdoor space balconies. 

 

The visionary architect Kirk Noyes has developed 45+ historic buildings in multiple states, and several architectural treasures right here in downtown Gloucester, like Central Grammar on Dale Avenue and the Wesley Condos on Prospect Street.

 

 

 

 The Gloucester Daily Times published a release by Lillian Shapiro about this special project. Read it here

“When we first looked at this building, we were immediately struck by its great condition…What we have done is create an accurate reproduction of the 1899 schoolhouse by doing things like reinventing the cornice detailing around the building, re-configuring old classrooms, and refurbishing the original staircase.”

-Kirk Noyes, architect, construction team member Maplewood School Residences as quoted in Gloucester Daily Times article by Lillian Shapiro

 

South Shore Art Center features North Shore artists Coco Berkman, Pia Juhl and Juni VanDyke #CohassetMA

The South Shore Art Center press release for September/October 2020 exhibition:                     

From North Shore to South Shore…Gloucester Comes to Cohasset 

Featuring three artists: COCO BERKMAN, PIA JUHL, JUNI VANDYKE

Cape Ann artist printmaker Coco Berkman creates images that delight her and hopefully others through the process of linoleum printmaking. Inspired by literature, the natural world, and the free play inherent in drawing, Berkman uses sharp Japanese tools to carve images into sheets of linoleum and then prints them one color at a time over several months to complete an edition. A member of the Boston Printmakers, Berkman’s work is represented by 13 Forest Gallery in Arlington and The Square Circle Gallery in Rockport. 

Pia Juhl, is well known for her light filled paintings depicting quarries and giant rock formations indigenous to her surroundings.  She has had numerous exhibitions in Europe and on Cape Ann including Jane Deering Gallery.    

Juni VanDyke will exhibit paintings related to her connection with Gloucester.  “The Cape Ann landscape is a subliminal force directing my art and tethering me to a love of color and the infinite configurations of abstraction.  Traveling to my work in Gloucester, I cross over the elevated Annisquam Bridge where below the sea is an ever changing miracle of patterns and light holding promise for later.”   VanDyke’s work is held in the permanent collection of Cape Ann Museum.  Her work is represented by Jane Deering Gallery, and throughout the US by Room and Board, Inc.

The exhibition continues through October 30th.

The South Shore Art Center is located at 119 Ripley Road, Cohasset

781-383-2787

 Zoom link (there is no password):https://zoom.us/j/91879749303

The event site link is: http://www.ssac.org/bancroft.asp

Images (in order)

Coco Berkman “The Reception” Lino Print

Juni VanDyke “View From Above” Acrylic and Oil on Board

Pia Juhl “Dogtown” Oil on Canvas

This week – Deborah Brown solo exhibition at Jane Deering Gallery

News from Jane Deering Gallery:

Jane Deering Gallery presents Deborah Brown solo show September 5 – 20, 2020
Saturdays & Sundays 1:00 – 3:00 P.M. 19 Pleasant Street . Gloucester

Ephemerata | a timeline of creation and change
works by Deborah Brown

 

The highly textural paintings (12×12 and 8×8) have occupied my impulsive hands for several years (2008-2020). What started as an inquisitive exploration of materials and depth became the challenge of transforming a flat surface into a three-dimensional abyss. An additional challenge was to transform the restrictive visual enclosure of the square to a dynamic metamorphic journey. Primal materials such as earth pigments, charcoal and volcanic ash reiterate the grit of progression, stasis and ultimate demise. — Deborah Brown

 

Deborah Brown studied at the San Francisco Art Institute and has exhibited her work throughout the United States. She is intensely private so you will not unearth her presence on Social Media; not a philistine, just a hermit. Having spent considerable time in Alaska, she now continues her art practice in her recently adopted home of Gloucester MA. 

 

I see my work as visceral and evocative, an embedded imprint on the limbic brain, relentlessly touched, molded, scraped and scattered with earthbound dust. And with a certain threatening charm to engage and provoke the viewer.

Deborah Brown

Who are the Historic Women Trailblazers of Massachusetts?

Massachusetts Office of Travel and Tourism readied a new digital publication for the historic women trailblazers trail. Check it out!

Link here

or download PDF

news from MOTT:

August 26, 2020 commemorated the 100th Anniversary of the signing of the 19th Amendment granting women the right to vote. This historic anniversary of suffrage was the perfect time to celebrate our Massachusetts Foremothers, more than 70 amazing women whose contributions to the Commonwealth, the nation and the world are unparalleled and who are recognized as “Trailblazers” in their fields. Click here to learn about the stories of these remarkable women and their ties to Massachusetts, The Woman Suffrage Movement, commemorative sculptures and statues at the Massachusetts State House, the significance of the Sunflower, the Colors of Suffrage and much more!

Signs of the times: we have a date! Cape Ann Museum plans for re-opening to the public Oct. 1 (and Sept. 24 for members) after COVID-19 closure

Reopening plans for museums are underway. Cape Ann Museum reopening plans feature a special extra bonus: the museum’s expansion, “Cape Ann Museum Green”, will be revealed!

Read all about it in the press release from Cape Ann Museum www.capeannmuseum.org

Image: Fitz Henry Lane (1804-1865)The Western Shore with Norman’s Woe, 1862. Oil on canvas.
Collection of the Cape Ann Museum, Gloucester, MA. Gift of Isabel Babson Lane, 1946 [1147.c]

The Cape Ann Museum is preparing to re-open its main campus at 27 Pleasant Street to the public on Oct. 1 with new safety precautions for social distancing, reduced capacity, touch-less doors, increased cleaning, and other measures that adhere to Gov. Baker’s Phase 3 re-opening plan and to protect the public while enjoying the Museum’s renowned art and maritime collections.

Museum members will be invited to return to the Pleasant Street campus on Sept. 24, and the Museum’s new Cape Ann Museum Green off Grant Circle will open to the public on Sept. 17 including the contemporary archival collections storage and public exhibition space, the Janet & William Ellery James Center.

At the new Cape Ann Museum Green, visitors will see a selection of images from The Porch-Rait Project, photographs of Gloucester families taken early in the COVID 19 pandemic as a benefit to The Open Door. Tickets for both sites may be reserved at www.camuseum.eventbrite.com.

“We are overjoyed to announce that we can re-open with the necessary precautions required by the state,” said Museum Director Oliver Barker. “As the global pandemic hit in March, we closed our doors to protect the staff and public. Since then, I think we have all been feeling the need to return to a place of inspiration, to see art that reminds us of the beautiful places in which we live, and to feel a sense of normalcy again by visiting the Museum and our new Cape Ann Museum Green campus.”

When visitors return to Pleasant Street on Oct. 1, they will see a newly re-installed and updated Lane Gallery, showcasing the work of marine artist Fitz Henry Lane (1804-1865). They will also be able to view three special exhibitions: Tom and T.M. Nicholas: A Father and Son’s Journey in Paint, which has been extended through November 1; Odds Were Against Me, featuring works by 20th century sculptors, Anna Vaughn Hyatt Huntington and Katharine Lane Weems, on view through January 3, 2021; and Our Souls are by Nature Equal to Yours, an exhibit exploring the life of early feminist writer Judith Sargent Murray, on view through November 8.

Here are some of the precautionary measures that the Museum will be taking when it re-opens:

  • The Museum will have limited opening hours from Thursday to Sunday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. to allow for ample cleaning. The time slot of 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. will be reserved for high risk populations to visit.
  • All visitors will need to make a reservation at www.camuseum.eventbrite.com to ensure limited capacity.
  • The Museum will only allow 7 percent occupancy in the galleries. There will be no public access to the Auditorium, Activity Center, or Davis House until further notice.
  • The Library & Archives will be closed due to ventilation issues, but access to the entire collection can be found online at capeannmuseum.org/research or by emailing library@capeannmuseum.org.
  • Visitors will be required to wear masks throughout their time in the Museum. Anyone without a mask will be offered one upon entry.
  • Social distancing in the galleries and throughout the Museum will be enforced by staff and security guards.
  • Limited docent tours will be offered.
  • Increased cleaning will happen during the Museum’s off-hours.
  • Main entrance and bathroom doors have been redesigned to open automatically for touch free access.

Continue reading “Signs of the times: we have a date! Cape Ann Museum plans for re-opening to the public Oct. 1 (and Sept. 24 for members) after COVID-19 closure”

It’s true! Linda Bosselman retiring from Sawyer Free Library on this gorgeous day. “Tend a beach tree sapling,” she gestures, ever an educator. #GloucesterMA

Touring the Sawyer Free Library grounds with Linda Bosselman on the occasion of her last day at work*, we receive a garden pep talk peppered with small gestures and comforting words. We almost forget that it’s her last day. Isn’t that typical of time spent with Linda? Her professional and unassuming smarts earned the trust of her colleagues, and make it a joy to learn from her experiences. An avid local history buff, photographer and community volunteer, she’ll be busy as ever. Still, it’s a big change with her having worked at Sawyer Free for the past three decades.

*Like other milestones during the pandemic, retirement (early) celebrations are altered.

 

happy retirement MESSAGES FOR LINDA –

 

Christy Rosso, Sawyer Free Library Director of Children’s Services, writes:

We have so many happy memories together, laughing over a huge display we had to do in a hurry — you frantically ironing hundreds of yards of blue fabric, me looping and winding it around City Hall for what seemed like days. It emerged as a beautiful and thoughtful addition to the event. Mischief managed. We designed many more wonderful displays and programs together, gardened, crafted, photographed, and grew a wonderful library and book collection together for our city’s children and families. Thank you so much for all of that. You have been a wonderful part of this library for 29 years. We are warmly appreciative for everything. We wish you happiness and more adventures ahead as you retire. Always,

Christy Rosso, Dir. Children’s Services

 

 

Sawyer Free Library Asst. Director, Beth Pocock writes:

Through her 29 years of service to the library, Linda has provided support in so many different areas; managing and circulating the collections, organizing and photographing programs, creating beautiful displays and brochures and answering every possible question about all things Gloucester. The list is endless. We love her and will miss her dearly but she has promised to fill in at the library every once in a while and that’s a comfort to us.

Beth Pocock, Asst. Director, Gloucester Lycecum & Sawyer Free Public Library

 

 

September 3, 1991- how lucky were we that day to have Linda Bosselman start working at Sawyer Free Library? She’s worked upstairs and downstairs, with adult’s and children’s services, with different co-workers and directors, for three decades. Helping generations of patrons. I mean it when I’m saying congratulations and thanks. Also all I really want to say is, “No, don’t leave!”

Justine Vitale, Librarian, Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Public Library

 

 

 

“These are beach tree saplings, not weeds. People can nurture descendants from this great gorgeous tree!”

“Volunteers could weed a little in between the landscaping crews; just toss under the hedge until they come through. And share their expertise helping point out weeds from the special native plants.”

“In the winter, I love to photograph the library from Middle Street with City Hall in the background. I climb up on the (YMCA) wall across the street, right there.”

“The tomatoes need to be picked soon or they’ll split.”

 

COMFORTABLE AS AN OLD SHOE: Mr. Mondello eponymous shoe repair shop around the corner has closed due to Covid-19 reopening plans. He’s taking early retirement at 93! CRUZ FERRERAS pens a beautiful thanks #GLOUCESTERMA

Cruz Ferreras writes:

The end of an era. Are you hearing that often lately? I am. A bit too many ends of eras.

Yesterday was a rainy day. My husband realized that his rubber rain boots have a puncture that lets water in the foot-bed. He said he thought he needed new boots. I said he should take them to Mr. Mondello first, because he would most likely find a way to plug the leak with melted rubber and extend the life of the boots for at least one more Autumn. And for just a few bucks.

Today a friend texted me news that due to Covid-19 Mr. Mondello took an early retirement at 93! A proud veteran, Mr. M. was always eager to share his background with customers at his cobbler shop. He has an unassuming sense of humor and the solid presence that 90 plus years of a productive life gives a person regardless of physical strength or frailty. Mr. M. looked like a solid man behind the counter. After a little chat he would ask for a very brief description of what was wrong with your shoes: 

I need to stretch them. 

I need the soles re-glued. 

I need more holes on the straps.

Check! 

Check! 

Check! 

I need rain boots plugged…no Mr. Mondello’s shop. No check. No apprentice to take over the shop, I bet. That’s too bad. One more win for the vortex of throw away culture we get swept into. 

I wish Mr. Mondello the best and healthiest of retirement. He has earned it. A town needs a cobbler. We had as good as they come. 

Cruz Ferreras thanks and best wishes in retirement for Mr. Mondello September 2020

Message and all photographs this post by Cruz Ferreras. The photographs were taken in July 2018.

COMFORTABLE AS AN OLD SHOE: MR. MONDELLO EPONYMOUS SHOE REPAIR SHOP AROUND THE CORNER CLOSES. HE’S TAKING EARLY RETIREMENT AT 93! CRUZ FERRERAS PENS A BEAUTIFUL THANKS #GLOUCESTERMA

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is july-2018_-mondello-shoe-repair-shop_a-fixture-in-gloucester-massachusetts_-owner-a-veteran_photograph-copyright-cruz-ferreras-6.jpg

Cruz Ferreras writes:

The end of an era. Are you hearing that often lately? I am. A bit too many ends of eras.

Yesterday was a rainy day. My husband realized that his rubber rain boots have a puncture that lets water in the foot-bed. He said he thought he needed new boots. I said he should take them to Mr. Mondello first, because he would most likely find a way to plug the leak with melted rubber and extend the life of the boots for at least one more Autumn. And for just a few bucks.

Today a friend texted me news that due to Covid-19 Mr. Mondello took an early retirement at 93! A proud veteran, Mr. M. was always eager to share his background with customers at his cobbler shop. He has an unassuming sense of humor and the solid presence that 90 plus years of a productive life gives a person regardless of physical strength or frailty. Mr. M. looked like a solid man behind the counter. After a little chat he would ask for a very brief description of what was wrong with your shoes:

I need to stretch them.

I need the soles re-glued.

I need more holes on the straps.

Check!

Check!

Check!

I need rain boots plugged…no Mr. Mondello’s shop. No check. No apprentice to take over the shop, I bet. That’s too bad. One more win for the vortex of throw away culture we get swept into.

I wish Mr. Mondello the best and healthiest of retirement. He has earned it. A town needs a cobbler. We had as good as they come.

Cruz Ferreras thanks and best wishes in retirement for Mr. Mondello September 2020

Message and all photographs this post by Cruz Ferreras. The photographs were taken in July 2018.

Harbor Village apartments 206 Main Street filling out #GloucesterMA

What a difference a month makes! Views surrounding new construction of Harbor Village apartments on 206 Main Street Gloucester, Mass. late August 2020. 

before, view past Cameron’s demo back in January 2020 with to Elm Street buildings and City Hall Tower in background.