Boston Globe: Cape Ann Museum Edward Hopper hype!

A big save the date–July 22, 2023–in today’s paper!

“The exhibition, accompanied by a 225-page catalog, will include 65 paintings, drawings, and prints, 57 of them by Hopper, seven by Nivinson, and one by Robert Henri…”

John Laidler. “Strokes of genius: Edward Hopper, one of the foremost American painters of the 20th century, launched his fame by creating visions of Gloucester. Now the Cape Ann Museum is preparing to display his works.” Boston Globe. Metro Section. Sunday paper 2/5/2023 and 2 days prior online. Laidler has shared news from the museum, library’s building project, and the school consolidation in the past couple of years.

Step into Edward Hopper’s life in Gloucester with the web-based digital Google map I first created in 2010, Edward Hopper all around Gloucester, that reveals where scores of Hopper’s works of art were inspired in Gloucester beyond a well known core, and corrected several misidentifications possibly hinting at Maine or Cape Cod. By my last tally, there’s more than 120 in Gloucester! The exhibition at Cape Ann Museum will gather Gloucester originals together from public and private collections which is no small feat. What a thrill and opportunity to wander and wonder about art and ideas, and celebrate Gloucester.

Jeff Weaver and Gloucester: Acclaimed Painter’s Solo exhibition opens at Cape Ann Museum March 18, 2023 #GloucesterMA

Jeff Weaver is an American artist who began painting the beauty and the built environment in Gloucester five decades ago and it’s remained his lifelong interest.

“This Unique Place: Painting and Drawing by Jeff Weaver”, will be on view at Cape Ann Museum from March 18, 2023 – June 4, 2023. What a welcome chance to survey Weaver’s deft, wry and luminous line and structure. What selection was decided upon by the curators and artist? Save the date to see! The first substantial catalogue of this contemporary American painter will accompany this landmark exhibit.

Weaver’s studio gallery is located on 16 Rogers Street and is open to the public on Saturdays. www.jeffweaverfineart.com

painting: Jeff Weaver, Tally’s Corner, 2003. | street scenes: Looking across to the studio from the sidewalk in front of Minglewood and Oak to Ember, St. Peter’s club is on the left and the Be Sargent Judith Murray mural in on the right.

Edward Hopper & Cape Ann: Exhibition Coming to Cape Ann Museum opens July 22 #GloucesterMA

Finally! A major exhibition of Hopper’s Gloucester is underway, and one that will be mounted right here in Gloucester. Mark your calendars for visits to Cape Ann Museum this summer to study up close 60 Edward Hopper paintings, drawings and prints inspired by Gloucester and Cape Ann, on loan from the Whitney Museum of American Art and other public and private collections, and featuring a selection of work by Josephine Nivinson Hopper.

Masterpiece drawings are rarely on public view or loaned because 1)they are fragile and watercolors are especially susceptible to light damage and 2)they can be a fixture highlight of a permanent collection which does not warrant any absence easily. This gathering of Hopper originals inspired by Gloucester at the Cape Ann Museum will truly be a once in a generation or lifetime opportunity to see the drawings on view and together in one venue. Investments and improvements into Cape Ann Museum facilities undertaken during Ronda Faloon’s tenure as former Director improved conditions so much that the museum can secure and protect temporary loans of such significance.

Edward Hopper & Cape Ann: Illuminating an American Landscape is on view at CAM this summer 2023. Opening on July 22, Hopper’s birthday, exactly 100 years after his pivotal trip to Gloucester (then celebrating its 300th anniversary), this once-in-a-generation exhibition offers a fresh look at one of America’s best-known artists at the crucial moment that profoundly shaped his art and his life. It shows the largely ignored but significant origin story of Hopper’s years in and around Gloucester, Massachusetts—a period and place that imbued Hopper’s paintings with a clarity and purpose that had eluded his earlier work. The success of Hopper’s Gloucester watercolors transformed his work in all media and set the stage for his monumental career.”

Cape Ann Museum read more here

Edward Hopper (1882-1967) earned respect from his colleagues since his student days and ‘world famous artist’ status in his own time. Admiration for his contribution to American 20th century art did not fade in the 21st century. Indeed it’s been supercharged. Dr. Elliot Bostwick Davis, a long time curator and former museum director, was brought in to lead the survey at Cape Ann Museum, and its accompanying catalogue, published by Rizzoli, the preeminent art publishing house, with a foreword by Adam Weinberg and available in May. Davis was part of the curatorial team that produced the major 2007 Hopper exhibit for the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston which traveled to the Art Institute of Chicago and National Gallery. Significant Hopper artworks are on permanent display and revered worldwide. One imagines that Davis’s efforts were certain to secure the loans Cape Ann Museum sought, and perhaps a future Hopper bequest for the museum. As an art dealer, I first met Dr. Davis when she was an assistant curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art when Colta Ives was the director of the print department.

I determined that there are more than 120 Edward Hopper works of art inspired by Gloucester, and mapped them which helped with the walking tour developed at Cape Ann Museum years after and was credited in CAM’s brochure. Less than 30 had been identified and some were credited to locations elsewhere in Massachusetts or out of state.

Publishers back in 2010 and 2012 did not think there was enough of a market for a Gloucester focused Hopper monograph. Good Morning Gloucester did and was the first to publish that research. In the past decade, Hopper surveys–whether narrow in focus, a broad retrospective traveling in the United States and abroad, or a viral social media expression during the pandemic–have been blockbusters and relevant, inspiring bequests, discoveries, and original work by filmmakers, playwrights, authors and musicians. It’s Gloucester’s time!

Edward Hopper, House in the Italian Quarter, 1923, watercolor, Smithsonian.

“#16 Fort Square Road, Gloucester, MA. Turn around with your back to Gloucester harbor and face “Tony’s House” at the angle shown here. In the painting, note the hint of  city skyline lower left, and the slight  slope along the right of the harbor. The double house and outhouses were irresistible and inevitable subjects.”

Catherine Ryan, 2010. Update: Shingles gone. The home was for sale in 2020, sold, and renovated. Blue cladding is recent. Photo with snow 1/24/2023. Note Birdseye in 2010 photos where Beauport Hotel is now.

The cover for the new catalogue features this home on Washington Street. The painting is in private hands, part of a wonderful collection in New York advised by fantastic curators associated with the Whitney. After this exhibit at Cape Ann Museum perhaps an eventual bequest here in Gloucester could happen.

Boston Globe Review | Of Garments and #GloucesterMA…Folly Cove Show at Cape Ann Museum

Great review. Read Murray Whyte’s rave here. He found a favorite. You will, too. Must see exhibit at Cape Ann Museum.

Folly Cove, art review, murray Whyte,Boston Globe,Cape Ann Museum, #GloucesterMA, Gloucester artists, Designed and Hand-Blocked by the Folly Cove Designers, November 2022,


“There are magical things here. The array of printed swatches of fabric might be the least beguiling element of a rich process — which is saying a lot, because they’re captivating. The group’s instrument of choice was the linocut block, each of them carved meticulously by hand.”

-Murray Whyte.

Whyte, Murray. (2022, Nov. 9). Of garments and Gloucester: celebrating the Folly Cove designers. Boston Globe.
Over decades, the women’s collective built a national following for their hand-printed fabrics and wares. In a new exhibition, the Cape Ann Museum looks at the process and precision that guided their handiwork.

Claire Wyzenbeek | Still Alight: Opening Reception with the artist Saturday October 1st from 2-5pm Jane Deering Gallery #gloucesterMA

Save the date for upcoming solo exhibition:

CLAIRE WYZENBEEK | Still Alight

October 1 – October 30, 2022

Opening reception: Saturday, October 1st from 2-5pm

Jane Deering Gallery, 19 Pleasant St., Gloucester, MA

Works from the exhibition can be viewed at:https://www.janedeeringgallery.com/claire-wyzenbeek-still-alight

The imagery in Claire’s paintings uses life events, emotions and states of awareness as
inspirations. This awareness comes from an internal truth or a deep connection to the natural world. Color has an emotional resonance that is often the starting point of a painting. Her figures and landscapes exist in symbolic settings, painted from both memory and life. Some juxtapose opposing sensations like joy and suffering, or love and anguish. In other works, she explores a specific feeling or physical experience. Recurring themes are renewal, journeys, the female body, relationships, and the spiritual power of Nature.

About the artist

Claire Wyzenbeek holds a BFA from Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and a Diploma (Painting and Art History) from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Massachusetts. She maintains a studio in Gloucester on Cape Ann, Massachusetts. Wyzenbeek teaches art at Yes Art Space in Beverly, Massachusetts. Her work has been exhibited in numerous shows regionally and nationally. Follow her at clairewyzenbeek.com and on Instagram @claire_skylark.

Powdered Rooftops and Streets #GloucesterMA Winter snow

Winter walks and drives after snow storms February 15 and February 26, Gloucester, Mass.

Feb. 26 Powdered roofs and streets

on the morning after snowstorm left 8-10″

Feb. 26 – Boulevard and beaches

Feb. 26 Shades of Blue and powder

February 15, 2022 sunrise

February 15, 2022 Looking for Hibbard

Thinking about all the colors in snow with light and shadow, and artists impressions of white, prompted a brief mission to Cape Ann Museum followed by a Rockport confirmation pass. (I know the Motif has been rebuilt and situated, and the Hibbard hill is fancy. Still. The thrill of tracing is immediate here!)

Cape Ann and Monhegan Island Vistas, CAM temporary exhibition did not disappoint and marked a rare stop since pre-covid. In January 2021 I was masked and looking at another Hibbard on display at CAM.

artists specific to this post – Aldro Hibbard, Henry Martin Gasser, Don Stone

RIP Mary Rhinelander McCarl #GloucesterMA

Condolences to Mary’s family and friends.

Mary Rhinelander McCarl Obituary


Mary Frederica Rhinelander McCarl died of heart failure on Monday, June 7, in Gloucester, Mass., at age 81. Born on May 3, 1940, in Abington, Pa., to Constance Templeton Rhinelander and Frederic William Rhinelander, M.D., she came of age in Boston. A proud graduate of the Winsor School for girls in 1957, she finished her bachelor’s degree in history magna cum laude at Radcliffe College in 1961. Over the next three decades, she earned three master’s degrees, in history (Harvard), library sciences (Simmons College), and archival sciences (UMass/Boston). She also completed the coursework for two history doctorates: the first in medieval studies in the 1960s at Harvard, and the second in the 1980s and 1990s in the History of the Book program at Boston University.

She was a gifted cook and artist specializing in watercolors, acrylics, fiber art, and collage. She was also a published scholar. In her 1997 book The Plowman’s Tale, she proved that published versions of Geoffrey Chaucer’s fourteenth-century Canterbury Tales contained a forgery written by radical Protestants centuries later during England’s religious wars. Her articles on colonial New England include histories of Salem’s witchcraft crisis (1692) and medical knowledge. Her historical activism includes her leadership in funding restoration of Gloucester’s 1876 city hall building. In 2015, she won a Citizenship Award from the Gloucester Unitarian Universalist Church.

Her first marriage, to John S. C. (Jack) Morgan, ended in divorce. Preceding her in death are her parents; her brother, John B. Rhinelander; and her stepdaughter, Kathy Maisel. She is survived by her husband of 34 years, Henry Newton McCarl; her daughter, Francesca Morgan (Charles Steinwedel) of Evanston, Ill.; two stepchildren, Patricia McCarl (Sussi Shavers) of Atlanta and Fred McCarl (April) of Oneonta, Ala.; two brothers, Frederic W. T. Rhinelander (Patricia) and David H. Rhinelander (Ann W.), and sister-in-law Jeanne C. Rhinelander, all of Gloucester; ten grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews including Edward L. Widmer.

Her family will announce a memorial service in Gloucester at a later date. In lieu of flowers, please consider donations to the Constance T. Rhinelander Performance Fund, Sawyer Free Library, 2 Dale Avenue, Gloucester, MA, 01930, 978-325-5500. Please specify the Rhinelander Performance Fund on all checks. Arrangements by the Campbell Funeral Home, 61 Middle Street, Gloucester.

Boston Globe Memorial Day 1927: Coast Guard seaplanes circled and scattered flowers to honor WWI fallen airmen Maxwell Parsons and Eric Adrian Lingard #GloucesterMA Harbor

The Boston Globe included Gloucester among its beautiful Memorial Day roundup in 1927. Inspired by Gloucester’s annual Fishermen’s Memorial service, a new addition was incorporated into Gloucester’s Memorial Day observances that year. Perhaps this gesture could return for future programs.

“Airplanes Strew Flowers Over Gloucester Harbor”

“This maritime place which some time ago adopted the custom of strewing the waves at an annual (Gloucester Fishermen’s) memorial service inaugurated another feature today.     

“During the exercises at the Cut Bridge, in honor of the Naval dead, two seaplanes from Coast Guard Base 7 commanded by Commander Carl C. Von Paulson and Ensign Leonard A. Melka, circled over the outer harbor strewing flowers.     

“Gloucester lost two airman during the WWI, Ensign Eric Adrian Lingard and 2d Liet. Maxwell Parsons.      “Members of the G.A.R. Spanish War Veterans, Legion, and auxiliaries proceeded to Oak Grove Cemetery this morning where exercises were held after which the veterans moved to the Cut Bridge. Details from the servicemen’s posts had previously decorated the graves with flowers and foliage. The main exercises were held this afternoon in City hall auditorium, which was filled to its capacity…”

Boston Globe, May 31, 1927

In 1937, the Gloucester Playground Commission dedicated the Maxwell Parsons Playground in East Gloucester, the neighborhood of his youth:

Named in Honor of

Lieut. Arthur Maxwell Parsons

U.S. Flying Corp

Born Dec. 11, 1895

Died July 3, 1918

Inscription on the tribute plaque

 

Eric Adrian Lingard

Have you watched Atlantic Crossing on PBS Masterpiece?

Local airman, Eric Adrian Lingard, was part of a daring and brave crew that drove a German U-Boat from the shores of his home state during the July 21, 1918 attack on Orleans, off Nauset Beach.

In 2012, Fred Bodin shared this dynamite photo with Good Morning Gloucester

Lingard Seaplane 1919 Gloucester Harbor – one he had flown

“On October 18th, 1918, Lingard’s plane went down in heavy seas due to engine failure, and he died of pneumonia 11 days later. The Lingard home is diagonally across Washington Street from the Annisquam Church, and was later the home of the renowned Crouse family (Sound of Music lyrics and actress Lindsey Crouse).”

Fredrik D. Bodin, Good Morning Gloucester, 2012

After suffering more than a day in rough seas off Cape Cod, all the while assisting another brother in arms, Lingard and others were rescued from the frigid deep. Later, he succumbed from pneumonia exposure [and/or 1918 flu epidemic, still present that late. For example, the “two brothers who co-founded the Dodge Bros. automobile manufacturing company contracted the flu in New York in 1919: John died at the Ritz hotel in January 1920, and Horace in December 1920 after a wicked year battling its complications.” Search “Notables- Flu Cases and the Arts” Influenza Epidemic 1918 of Gloucester]

Open space in Annisquam, Soldiers’ Memorial Woods, was given by Lingard’s sister, Olga, his sole family member.

NAME: Annisquam Soldiers Memorial Wood
LOCATION: Washington Street, along Lobster Cove
CAMPAIGN: World War I
TYPE: Bronze tablet in granite stone
DATE DEDICATED: July 7, 1929
INSCRIPTION:
Annisquam
Soldiers Memorial Wood
In grateful remembrance of
John Ernest Gossom
Eric C. Lingard
Bertram Williams
who gave their lives for their country
in the World War

-from Gloucester, Ma. Archives Committee

Lingard’s name can be found WWI | Harvard Memorial Church

Where is the hull of Seaplane HS 1695, decommissioned by then Sect. State FDR to Gloucester’s park commission? GMG reader Bill Hubbard commented on Bodin’s photo, surmising:

“Nice old photo, Fred. For years before and during WW-II, the hull of a similar plane was in the lower level of the Twin Light Garage on East Main Street. The garage was owned by the late Ray Bradly who lived on Rocky Neck. As kids, we often played around it and I remember Ray telling us that it had been a WW-I airplane – I believe it was an old Coast Guard bi-winged seaplane. There were no wings or rudder, just the hull which was shaped very much like the one in the picture. Not long after the end of the war, they dragged it out to the flats on Smith Cove and burned it.”

Bill Hubbard, GMG reader comment reply to Fred Bodin, 2012

Fred Buck selected Joan of Arc photographs from the Cape Ann Museum for the HarborWalk Joan of Arc marker. We liked this one. The parade retinue includes a truck carrying wreckage from Lingard’s plane.

Joan of Arc in Legion Square. photog. unknown. date unknown. Lingard’s plane.

Cape Ann Museum FREE for families April School Vacation Week! Artist Michael Grimaldi #GloucesterMA Sea Serpent sighting & siting adventures await!👀🐍

Mark your calendars for a Cape Ann Museum visit this week. I’ll follow up in a part 2 post after I visit inside. Happy sea serpent seeking!

Spring News from Cape Ann Museum

April Vacation Week Thursday, April 22 – Sunday, April 25

Free Museum entrance to all families with children under 18

Take a break from the screen and come visit the Cape Ann Museum with your kids during April Vacation Week! Reserve timed entrance for you and your family to follow the Museum’s new family-friendly guide, Cassie the Sea Serpent, by Michael Grimaldi, through the galleries. Inspired by the Cape Ann Sea Serpent, which was seen by hundreds in Gloucester Harbor between 1817-1819, Cassie poses questions and activities for students of all ages to engage with the collection. During April Vacation Week, all visitors will receive a free copy of Cassie’s Scavenger Hunt with activities and crayons included.

About the Artist: Gloucester-born artist Michael Grimaldi is a local muralist, graphic designer, and Monserrat College of Art graduate who now lives in Beverly.

For more information about the Museum, its programs, exhibits, and collections, visit www.capeannmuseum.org.

Work in progress shared by CAM on GMG

Bonus!

“In 2019, a nine-foot bronze sculpture of the Gloucester Sea Serpent was installed at the Museum’s front entrance. It was designed by Essex artist Chris Williams who has created a scaled-down version of his serpent for families to take home during the vacation week.”

– Cape Ann Museum

Chris Williams sculpture

1890 Boston Globe historic houses article features White Ellery #GloucesterMA

Then and Now

woodcut illustration for 1890 Boston Globe article | photos: c. ryan, mostly 2021

The first Massachusetts home featured in this Boston Globe historic house article was Gloucester’s “Ellery house”, as a classic First Period saltbox:

OLD HOMES, OLD FAMILIES. Houses in New England, Each of Which Has for Three or More Generations Sheltered the Same Race. Romances Drawn from Wood and Brick

The Sunday Globe begins today to publish stories and pictures of old New England homesteads which have sheltered at least three generations of the families now living in them.

This is not so endless a task as some may suppose it to be. New England, no doubt, contains a greater number of old houses than any other division of the country, but it is rare indeed to find one among those that has been long in the possession of the same family. Such a shifting of ownerships may reflect the growing prosperity of the original occupants who perchance have built greater homes than those of their fathers, but often the disappearance of the inheritors of these ancestral houses signifies either the utter extinction or the scattering and breaking up of the family.

The sketches in this series opening today appeal, therefore, in a peculiar way to the public curiosity, and the Sunday Globe would thank any of its readers if they would call attention to any houses within their own knowledge which may be occupied by a family who have possessed the property through three or more generations continuously or otherwise.

There are various periods in the history of Gloucester house building, each marked quite as distinctly to the architectural student as the different strata of the earth’s crust indicate to the geologist the various periods of formation. In the case of the old houses of note it may be said that they all belonged to the upper crust.

The houses of the first settlers of Gloucester, with rare exceptions, have long since been replaced by others of more elaborate design, and the few remaining in the suburbs are small one-story edifices of no particular architectural pretensions.

In common with Boston, Salem, Newburyport and other colonial seaports, Gloucester once owned a large fleet of ships, brigs and barks, that sailed to foreign ports, exchanging the products of the town and of the county for Spanish gold and Surinam molasses, which was converted into New England rum.

These merchants built commodious residences and dispensed a hospitality commensurate with their position as leaders of the social and intellectual life of the town.

The most historic edifice in town is the Ellery house, which stands just below the old meeting house green on Washington street in Riverdale, a suburb of the town.

It was built by Rev. John White shortly after he came here in 1702 to minister to the spiritual wants of the First Parish, receiving a grant of land from the town on which to build his home. At that time the main settlement was in that portion of the community, but the necessities of commerce and fishing made it convenient for the inhabitants to remove nearer the seashore, deserting their first habitations on what is now known as “Dogtown Common,” where the remains of their cellars can still be traced today.

The type of architecture is well portrayed by the accompanying cut. On the projection which overhangs the lower story in front there were four balls pendant, a style of decoration of the times, which have long been removed.

Inside, the old-fashioned low studded style of room is at once apparent, and the antique furnishings and general air of the place make one realize more vividly the age of the house and fixtures, which are of a nature to bring joy to the heart of an antiquarian.

Some of the furniture in the parlor is about 200 years old. The house was bought in 1710 by Capt. William Ellery, and it still remains in the hands of his direct descendants, the occupants being John Ellery and his wife. Thus it will be seen that it has been in this family 150 years.

The purchaser of the house was a son of the original settler, William Ellery. The Ellery family were prominent in the social and intellectual life of the place from the first, being leading merchants. Hon. Benjamin Ellery, called in the family “Admiral,” was the eldest brother of William. He went from Gloucester and settled in Rhode Island and was the father of Deputy Gov. William Ellery and grandfather of William Ellery who signed the Declaration of Independence, the signer being a grandnephew of the first owner of the house.”

Boston Globe 1890*

Read the full article (PDF) to see the other Massachusetts homes selected for the article.

The Declaration of Independence connection was artfully slipped in. Fast facts on the signers from the National archives here.

*For current information visit Cape Ann Museum

The White Ellery House is part of the Cape Ann Museum collection. There are inaccuracies in the 1890 nutshell above. James Stevens and the tavern he operated is absent. The rum trade is acknowledged; any NE slave trade economic connections are not. [Massachusetts was the first colony to legalize slavery. Vermont was the first to abolish (VT 1777 vs. MA 1783).] The article predates the build out of Rt. 128 which rallied a preservation relocation.

Maybe CAM might commission a set of woodcuts of the historic properties as they are now by various local artists.

Beautiful improvements on the grounds of Cape Ann Museum

note: pinch and zoom or double click to enlarge photos.

Gloucester in the news: Wall Street Journal covers Fitz Henry Lane and Cape Ann Museum

Pauline’s friend Gary shared a photo of his paper (Pauline’s Gifts). Beautiful- thanks for sending!

“A Luminist’s Hometown Harbor: The Cape Ann Museum Holds an Unrivaled of Painter and Printmaker Fitz Henry Lane’s work” By Willard Spiegelman Wall Street Journal March 4, 2021

“the Cape Ann Museum, a showcase for work by local artists of sometimes international reputation and a generous gallimaufry of objects relating to local history, the fishing industry, granite quarrying, and the immigrant communities that have kept Gloucester vibrant. Boats and the sea are its leitmotifs.

Founded in 1875, renamed in 2007, it is no longer the modest historical society it began as, but a real art museum.”

Willard Spiegelman WSJ article published 3/4/2021
courtesy photo Pauline’s friend Gary

Boston Globe good news – art critic weighs in on Cape Ann Museum walking tours and #GloucesterMA planning

Boston Globe “Walking Through History With Some of History’s Greatest Artists” by Murray Whyte published 2/9/2021

“Gloucester’s rich history feels carved into the very stone that lines its harbors, and the Cape Ann Museum has done well to seize on all of those elements this winter to craft a series of walking tours that fix the town firmly with its cultural heritage.”

Murray Whyte for Boston Globe on Cape Ann Museum winter walking tours, 2/9/2021

“…an around-town stroll to the many houses and scenes painted by Edward Hopper on his five extended painting journeys here. They’re captivating, and in one case, crushing: The spectacular mansard-roofed captain’s house perched high on a Rocky Neck cliff that Hopper painted in 1924 now shares its view of Gloucester Harbor with a sprawling McMansion next door whose aesthetic might best be described as haute Florida strip mall.”

Register for Cape Ann Museum upcoming walks like Feb. 20 (Spiritual history) and Feb. 27 (Edward Hopper) HERE

Happy to see the Cape Ann Museum guided walking tours featured!

Not to worry! The historic house on Clarendon is gorgeous. Edward Hopper customized his take on Gloucester vistas, as did artists before him.

Here is the Gardner Wonson home (built circa 1873) in horse and buggy days, a scene cropped for commercial keepsake photographs published by the Procter Brothers who were flying high in the 1870s [collection New York Public Library].

This home was an architectural attraction Hopper may have seen before he stepped foot off the train for his first visit to Gloucester.

In 1846 entrepreneurial publishing dynamos and developers, brothers Francis with George H. Procter, set up a book and printing shop. By 1850 they moved to Main Street. As the business grew, their news dispatch morphed from “Procter’s Able Sheet” to “Gloucester Advertiser” to “Cape Ann Advertiser”, and then in 1888 to “Gloucester Daily Times”. By 1892 the printing press for the newspaper branch alone could churn out 4000 papers, eight pages long, every hour (see Pringle). Any small business operating for decades and successive generations will suffer its share of adversity. Procter Brothers was leveled not once but twice by fire, and rebuilt. They published or were the go to printers for all manner of media: books, periodicals, photographs, lithographs, even a circulating library from their headquarters in 1874; building back and then some after that 2nd conflagration. The Wonson home was featured in a tourist photograph series, “Cape Ann Scenery”.

Boston Globe: Learn more about Edward Hopper in #GloucesterMA Cape Ann Museum guided walking tours

“An Off Season Stroll Through Edward Hopper’s Vision of Gloucester” Boston Globe article by Diane Bair and Pamela Wright. Reporters enjoyed a wonderful Cape Ann Museum Walking Tour followed up by a visit to Cape Ann Brewery. Read the piece here

Upcoming walking tours by Cape Ann Museum:

Signs of the times: we have a date! Cape Ann Museum plans for re-opening to the public Oct. 1 (and Sept. 24 for members) after COVID-19 closure

Reopening plans for museums are underway. Cape Ann Museum reopening plans feature a special extra bonus: the museum’s expansion, “Cape Ann Museum Green”, will be revealed!

Read all about it in the press release from Cape Ann Museum www.capeannmuseum.org

Image: Fitz Henry Lane (1804-1865)The Western Shore with Norman’s Woe, 1862. Oil on canvas.
Collection of the Cape Ann Museum, Gloucester, MA. Gift of Isabel Babson Lane, 1946 [1147.c]

The Cape Ann Museum is preparing to re-open its main campus at 27 Pleasant Street to the public on Oct. 1 with new safety precautions for social distancing, reduced capacity, touch-less doors, increased cleaning, and other measures that adhere to Gov. Baker’s Phase 3 re-opening plan and to protect the public while enjoying the Museum’s renowned art and maritime collections.

Museum members will be invited to return to the Pleasant Street campus on Sept. 24, and the Museum’s new Cape Ann Museum Green off Grant Circle will open to the public on Sept. 17 including the contemporary archival collections storage and public exhibition space, the Janet & William Ellery James Center.

At the new Cape Ann Museum Green, visitors will see a selection of images from The Porch-Rait Project, photographs of Gloucester families taken early in the COVID 19 pandemic as a benefit to The Open Door. Tickets for both sites may be reserved at www.camuseum.eventbrite.com.

“We are overjoyed to announce that we can re-open with the necessary precautions required by the state,” said Museum Director Oliver Barker. “As the global pandemic hit in March, we closed our doors to protect the staff and public. Since then, I think we have all been feeling the need to return to a place of inspiration, to see art that reminds us of the beautiful places in which we live, and to feel a sense of normalcy again by visiting the Museum and our new Cape Ann Museum Green campus.”

When visitors return to Pleasant Street on Oct. 1, they will see a newly re-installed and updated Lane Gallery, showcasing the work of marine artist Fitz Henry Lane (1804-1865). They will also be able to view three special exhibitions: Tom and T.M. Nicholas: A Father and Son’s Journey in Paint, which has been extended through November 1; Odds Were Against Me, featuring works by 20th century sculptors, Anna Vaughn Hyatt Huntington and Katharine Lane Weems, on view through January 3, 2021; and Our Souls are by Nature Equal to Yours, an exhibit exploring the life of early feminist writer Judith Sargent Murray, on view through November 8.

Here are some of the precautionary measures that the Museum will be taking when it re-opens:

  • The Museum will have limited opening hours from Thursday to Sunday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. to allow for ample cleaning. The time slot of 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. will be reserved for high risk populations to visit.
  • All visitors will need to make a reservation at www.camuseum.eventbrite.com to ensure limited capacity.
  • The Museum will only allow 7 percent occupancy in the galleries. There will be no public access to the Auditorium, Activity Center, or Davis House until further notice.
  • The Library & Archives will be closed due to ventilation issues, but access to the entire collection can be found online at capeannmuseum.org/research or by emailing library@capeannmuseum.org.
  • Visitors will be required to wear masks throughout their time in the Museum. Anyone without a mask will be offered one upon entry.
  • Social distancing in the galleries and throughout the Museum will be enforced by staff and security guards.
  • Limited docent tours will be offered.
  • Increased cleaning will happen during the Museum’s off-hours.
  • Main entrance and bathroom doors have been redesigned to open automatically for touch free access.

Continue reading “Signs of the times: we have a date! Cape Ann Museum plans for re-opening to the public Oct. 1 (and Sept. 24 for members) after COVID-19 closure”

Cape Ann Museum update about their new digs ‘Cape Ann Museum Green campus’ #GloucesterMA

photo caption: Cape Ann Museum Green campus with a view from the new12,000 square foot Janet & William Ellery James Center out to the campus which includes three historic buildings (from right to left) the White Ellery House (1710), an adjacent Barn (c. 1740), and the Babson-Alling House (c.1740), all located on the site at the intersection of Washington and Poplar Streets in Gloucester.  Photo by Steve Rosenthal, 2020.

NEWS FROM CAPE ANN MUSEUM:

Cape Ann Museum Green campus taking shape with landscaping, solar panels, and final touches

GLOUCESTER, MASS. (August 2020) – Preparations for Cape Ann Museum Green, the Museum’s new campus off Grant Circle and Route 128 in Gloucester, have continued over the summer with further grass and new trees planted as part of an overall landscape design that will aesthetically combine three historic buildings on the property with a new contemporary archival collections storage and public exhibition space called the Janet & William Ellery James Center.

Designed to dramatically expand the Museum’s community, contemporary art and educational offerings, the almost four-acre campus is home to the three historic structures, the White Ellery House (1710), an adjacent Barn (c. 1740), and the Babson-Alling House (c.1740), all located on the site at the intersection of Washington and Poplar Streets in Gloucester. The new 12,000-square foot James Center includes 2,000 square feet of flexible exhibition and community programming space designed to reach broader audiences with new exhibits and public programs.  The James Center was built to LEED Platinum standards and was designed by Boston-based designLAB.  Integral to the building’s environmental footprint is the installation later this year of a 173KW Solar Array system on the building’s roof, and with recent city approval temporary art banners are now planned for the building’s Route 128 facing exterior.

“It has been thrilling to watch Cape Ann Museum Green evolve over the, last year” said Oliver Barker, the Museum’s Director. “This unique location, visible at the entrance to Cape Ann, offers a historic connection from the 1700s until today. The Museum’s mission is to celebrate our rich, diverse and deep history here on Cape Ann while also continually discovering new works by contemporary artists. This property symbolically brings all of that together in one place as the Gateway to Cape Ann.”

This pivotal Museum initiative has been in development since 2017 and was led by a Cape Ann Museum Green Committee chaired by William (Wilber) James. “The Museum is indebted to Wilber and his Committee, which includes Sam Holdsworth, Norm Chambers, John Cunningham, Stephanie Benenson, Dick Carlson and Suzi Natti, with encouragement and support from Board Chair Charles Esdaile, for their leadership, vision and commitment to creating a new cultural experience for our community and for visitors to Cape Ann,” Barker said.

“We are but threads in the fabric of life, building on the efforts of those who came before us and setting the stage for future generations” said Wilber James. “This property builds on the vision of our forebears and we invite others to join the Cape Ann Museum today in setting the stage for the future as a leading regional museum of American art that is relevant and engages our community.”

The James Center will provide critical state-of-the-art storage for the Museum’s expanding collections as well as the community space for education and art installations. Landscaping has been progressing since spring with the planting of dozens of indigenous trees, shrubs, and flowers alongside the campus’s notable fieldstone wall constructed from stones found throughout the property. A sculpture park at the campus is envisioned for the future.

photo caption: (Left) Fitz Henry Lane (1804-1865), Babson and Ellery Houses, Gloucester, 1863, oil on canvas, Cape Ann Museum, Gloucester, MA, gift of Roger W. Babson, 1937 [779.02]  (Right) Fitz Henry Lane (1804-1865), The Babson Meadows at Riverdale, 1863, oil on canvas, Cape Ann Museum, Gloucester, MA, gift of Roger W. Babson, 1937 [779.03].

The bucolic Cape Ann Museum Green property was the subject of three Fitz Henry Lane paintings in 1863, two of which are now at the Cape Ann Museum. View of the Babson and Ellery Houses, Gloucester, shows the Route 128 side of the property, while The Babson Meadows at Riverdale, looking from the rear of the Babson-Alling House, with its meticulously rendered field stone wall and gate provided the framework on which the CAM Green perimeter field stone wall and new entry gates, all designed and crafted by local Gloucester artisans,  were recently installed to recall that historic time..

Due to the pandemic, the official opening of Cape Ann Museum Green has been postponed until June 2021, but news about opportunities for the public to see the campus in socially distant appropriate ways starting in mid-September is forthcoming.

The creation of the Cape Ann Museum Green campus is a critical component of the Museum’s 2018-2023 Strategic Plan and the commitment to enhance facilities by providing space for current holdings and anticipating future strategic collection growth in a sophisticated climate-controlled and highly secure building.

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So cool! Only in #GloucesterMA BYOB as in BRING YOUR OWN BOAT arts & culture tour from the water led by Cape Ann Museum

Signs of the times: Creativity in the time of Covid-19

Cape Ann Museum is offering a special cultural tour. Enjoy special sites connected to art and history from your boat!

“Participating vessels will be guided along the coast of Cape Ann on a tour that highlights spots that were fundamentally important in the careers of many of America’s greatest artist, including Fitz Henry Lane, Winslow Homer, Jane Peterson, Edward Hopper, Milton Avery, Mark Rothko and more!”

art walking tour by boat cape ann musuem

Cape Ann Museum leads wonderful walking tours, too.

TIME magazine on museums and historic homes during Covid-19 features Salem Massachusetts

 

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Excerpt from ‘The Uncertain Future of Places That Preserve America’s Past’

“Thanks to the City’s infamous witch trials, the historic homes and gardens on the Salem, Mass., waterfront usually get about a third of their annual visitors in the Halloween season. But the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting lock-downs have created a scary situation for these places: most of the rest of their visitors arrive in the spring and summer. Thanks to the pandemic, this year’s busy time has been a wash, and it’s not looking like the fall will be much different. At the site of Salem’s The House of the Seven Gables and Nathaniel Hawthorne’s birthplace…” Read the full article TIME magazine here

Peabody Essex Museum has reopened with a modified schedule:

“Thursdays through Sundays from 10 am to 5 pm. To allow for safe physical distancing, a limited number of visitors will be allowed inside the museum and its galleries at any time. Reserve your tickets in advance at pem.org/tickets or by calling 978-542-1511.”

In Gloucester, both Beauport Museum and Hammond Castle are open. While Cape Ann Museum is not open, its on line, virtual fare has increased. Check out “CAM connects”- the most recent July 23, 2020 Cape Ann Music

Hammond Castle-  Advance purchase of timed tickets is required to enter the museum. Purchase your tickets here. Guest are also welcome to explore the Museum grounds including the Bell Tower, Drawbridge, Look Out Point and our iconic archesThe grounds are open from 9:30 am to 4 pm daily. Face masks are required and social distancing should be maintained as recommended by the State of Massachusetts and the City of Gloucester.

Beauport Museum – Historic New England property details: “The tour has been altered to maximize social distancing, and each tour is limited to four guests. Please read the “Know Before You Go” section below for more information on safety requirements. Advance tickets are required, and admission is free for Historic New England members. Buy tickets now.”