Sundance winner ‘Coda’ big night movie premiere at Gloucester Cinema – great article by Gail McCarthy Gloucester Daily Times

Beautiful read and interviews! More photos from the Vitale family and Film Cape Ann below.

“The charms of Gloucester exploded on the big screen at the local unveiling of the film “CODA,” a four-time winner at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.

The special event Thursday evening, intended for those who worked or assisted in some way with the film, turned out to be “the” premiere  after  director Sian Heder learned that the West Coast screening was canceled.

“Our premiere in L.A. isn’t happening so you are at the premiere,” she told the attendees at the Gloucester Cinema on Essex Avenue. “But I’m so excited to be here and share this with you. This is the first time I am seeing it with an audience. This film is a love letter to Gloucester…”

Gail McCarthy
‘A love letter to Gloucester’: Sundance winner ‘CODA’ premieres before local crowd
Gloucester Daily Times
published on line Saturday July 24, 2021, in print Monday

Read Gail McCarthy’s article here

Film Cape Ann

Filmed in Gloucester in late summer and fall in 2019 before Covid, the movie benefited from the local Film Tax Credit (as will the upcoming movie, Confess, Fletch, starring John Slattery and Jon Hamm). Locations in town for CODA feature Pratty’s and the bandstand in Rockport. Many local hires involved, including Elana Lee, ASL interpreter.

“#FilmCapeAnn was thrilled to have CODA anchored in our area.

Productions that highlight the core beauty of our year round working waterfront depicted in CODA, and past films like The Perfect Storm & Manchester-by-the-Sea, are a huge part of the area’s contribution to the Massachusetts film industry, and making the Mass. Film Incentive permanent. We thank the MA Film Office and State Senator Bruce Tarr & Representative Ann Margaret Ferrante for their strong effort with this incentive as well.” 

Meg Jarrett, Film Cape Ann

Photo credits below: Film Cape Ann

Photo credits below: Action! from the film shoot (early fall 2019, before Covid; and the big premiere night 2021. Courtesy the Vitale family

You can help a family #GloucesterMA – March is National Kidney Month – Desperately Seeking healthy kidney O+/-🩸 type

Rose (Vitale) Geomelos grew up in Gloucester. Some GMG readers may know Rose and her relatives, including brother, Paul Vitale. You may have seen the sch. Angela & Rose heading out and returning.

That’s Rose’s name on her brother’s boat.

photo caption: Angela & Rose – photo copyright © Paul Frontiero

Rose is reaching out. Her husband, Lenny Geomelos, a hard working, youth sports coaching, North Shore man–with Gloucester family– is in urgent need of a healthy kidney.

If you are O +/- blood type, please consider registering for the kidney donation program for Lenny Geomelos, or the *paired exchange program for kidney donation. You’ll help save a life and family.

The first time I heard about kidney donors was when a friend of my family, who resided in Rockport, registered to be a kidney donor and eventually was a match, some time back in the 1990s. Her generosity inspired all, and helped save a family like Rose’s & Lenny’s.

Before our friend became a donor she read about it in the local paper, long before there was any social media. Who knows? Someone reading GMG might be a good fit or be the connecting share that helps this family meet a just right match. March is National Kidney Month so please share to help spread awareness.

“Sometimes it’s very difficult to do anything outside of your comfort zone for many different reasons. Seeking help is most definitely one that is out of my comfort zone, but I also realize for the sake of my wife and children, I need to take that step and seek help from altruistic strangers or possibly even people that may know me through my wife Rose, who was born and raised in Gloucester.”

– My name is Lenny Geomelos and I am in desperate need of a new and healthy, life-saving kidney. March 2021

How to help

For anyone interested in helping me, or spreading the word to others, the initial contact must come from potential donor candidate by registering with the Living Kidney Donor Center at Brigham & Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts.

Go to Register as a potential donor – Donor Registration (donorscreen.org)  to register as a potential donor and submit the application.  When asked who you are looking to help, please enter LEONARD GEOMELOS. It’s easy to sign up but it’s not so easy to find a match. We have been unable thus far.

*Paired Exchange Program – If you are not a direct blood type match to the person you are seeking to help, you can enter the program whereby your kidney may match another patient in need within the program; and in turn, another person in the program that might be a direct match to the person you are looking to help, will receive a kidney in exchange for your donated kidney.

Fast facts

  • Name- Leonard Geomelos; I am 55 years old and I am feeling the severely negative impact of my declining kidney functions. Born and raised on the North Shore
  • Wife- Rose (Vitale) Geomelos, Gloucester, Mass. native
  • Kids- daughter in high school; son in middle school
  • Hospital – Brigham & Women’s Hospital in Boston, MA. Fun fact: Dr. Joseph E. Murray and associates at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital performed the FIRST successful living donor transplant–a brother for his identical twin.
  • 150,000 transplants in the United States were made possible by living donors

What happened to my kidney?

I have been a diabetic for most of my adult life and have successfully managed my sugar levels.

A few years ago, I lost weight and became healthier which enabled me to get off my diabetes medications, however, my blood pressure and sugar levels inexplicably became quite elevated and landed me in the hospital twice in the span of about 8 months, where unfortunately my kidneys took an enormous hit and since then, my kidney functions have just continued to decline to where I learned in November 2019 that I’m in Stage 5 kidney failure which has forced me to now require Dialysis.

My family

“I love my family and want to continue to be here for them.  I have my wonderful wife Rose by my side and our beautiful children – our 15-year-old daughter and our 13-year-old son that I provide for and love more than anything.

I very much want to continue being here growing old with my loving wife whom I adore, and also continue to watch our children grow up in life and have the opportunity to share many more years of great memories.

I want to walk my beautiful daughter — when the time comes — down the aisle, when she is ready to begin that new chapter in her life. And I want to be there when my son makes that same transition from youth into becoming a family man himself.

A life-saving kidney would also afford me the opportunity to hopefully someday meet, hold, and watch my grandchildren grow up, and I want to do all that with my loving wife right by my side.”

Lenny

My job – I have worked with the same company for almost 40 years

I was taught at a young age by my parents that to achieve anything, you have to work hard and also give back to your community. I started working at a young age of 10 years old and consider myself a very hard and loyal worker with strong work ethics and strong family values. I have been with the same company for almost 40 years.

My job is extremely physical and my condition is making it harder for me to do my job. I will never quit because I feel that is not an option since I have never quit anything in my life.

My community

Through my years, I have donated my time to youth sports and also various charity events through my affiliation with the Shriners. I am a youth sports coach and have coached baseball, softball and still coach youth football. Thus, I would very much like to continue to be involved in those youth sport programs, especially for my son. It means so much to watch young athletes grow with the sport and help them develop a love for the game, but more importantly, I aim to teach athletes to understand that through their participation in sports, they come to value the importance of family and education, as well as, the importance of teamwork and teaching kids to overcome obstacles in sports that may help them to use those same skills to overcome any potential obstacles in life. And here I face one of those obstacles in my life that I am in turn, reaching out for help to overcome!

“And so, I am hopeful in finding that ‘someone wonderful’ out there — who will find it in their heart to bless my family and I — that beautiful “GIFT OF LIFE!”

No amount of THANK YOUs could ever express the gratitude I would feel in finding that special person out there that is willing and able to help in my quest to find a healthy new kidney for me.”

Lenny

Nicolo “Nicky” Vitale Obituary | Gloucester Fisherman

Nicolo Nicky Vitale obituary

Nicolo “Nicky” Vitale obituary

Gloucester – In loving memory of Gloucester Fisherman Nicolo Vitale 49, who passed away on April 20, 2020 at Addison Gilbert Hospital.

Known fondly as Nick or Nicky to many, he was born in Gloucester, MA on April 24, 1970. He was the son of Maria (Groppo) Vitale and the late Giuseppe Vitale of Trappeto, Sicily.

He grew up in Gloucester until the early eighties before he moved to Trappeto, Sicily with his parents and his younger sister. He returned to Gloucester in 1988 where he remained living until the sea winds called upon him.

Nicky was a fisherman for most of his adult life. Nicky deeply enjoyed being a fisherman on the open ocean, especially with a crew of friends or family. Anyone that knew Nicky personally, was lucky enough to experience his hearty laugh and infectious and bright smile. He was always happiest when he was surrounded by his closest friends and family, as well as, making his rounds in visiting with people at a local coffee shop, or at the St Peter’s Club, or his favorite pizzeria or at someone’s house for espresso. He loved to joke around with the best of them and just cared to make people laugh and smile and enjoy each other’s company! Continuing with his Sicilian traditions always remained important to Nicky, such as being with family and friends for St. Joseph’s Day and the St. Peter’s Fiesta. No one can deny the enormous and genuine heart Nicky had; he would do anything for anyone if they asked or if he saw they needed help, he’d just jump right in, no questions asked!

In April 2001, Nicky earned his 100 – ton captain’s license, an accomplishment he was very proud of. In 2003, he earned his GED from Gloucester High School. Following his return back to the States, Nicky mainly built a life out at sea as a local fisherman and he fished on the following fishing vessels: Stella Del Mare, Angela & Rose, Christina Eleni, Miss Trish, Miss Sandy, Miss Trish II, Cathy C, Sabrina Maria, Razo, Kayla Maria, and the Helen S III.

He is survived by his loving mother Maria, sister Angela (Vitale) Regina, beloved nephew Antonio Regina who he adored with every fiber of his being, brother-in-law Paride Regina and maternal grandparents Giuseppe and Lucia Groppo, all of Trappeto, Sicily. He also leaves behind his Uncle Leonardo Vitale and aunt Rosalie, Uncle Pasquale Vitale and aunt Giovanna, Uncle Francesco Groppo and aunt Crocetta, all of Gloucester and Aunt Piera Vitale of Terrasini, Sicily. He will be remembered fondly by cousins Nicolo Vitale of Naples, FL and wife Angela, Rosa (Vitale) Geomelos of Danvers and husband Lenny, Paul Vitale of Gloucester and wife Justine, Angela Vitale of Gloucester and fiancé Rick, Nick Vitale of Gloucester, Fabrizio Vitale of Clearwater, FL and fiancé Sally, Maria (Groppo) Carpenter of Gloucester and Daniel, Enza Groppo of Gloucester, Nicolo Vitale of Brussels, Belgium and wife Enza, Mario Vitale of Terrasini, Sicily and wife Fanny and Daniele Vitale of Terrasini, Sicily and wife Gessica. He also adored his godchildren Kayla Collibee and Ava Vitale. He had many cousins, including in California, Germany and Sicily, and some wonderful friends that treated Nicky like family.

He is predeceased by his father Giuseppe Vitale, uncle Antonino Vitale, grandparents Nicolo and Angela Vitale, and cousin Angela A. Vitale.

Due to the COVID-19 Pandemic, visiting services with his family were held privately. A memorial mass and Celebration of Nicky’s life will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to Nick’s Fishermen’s Safety Fund through Cape Ann Savings Bank, 109 Main Street, Gloucester, MA 01930 to help provide personal safety devices to fishermen. Arrangements by Greely Funeral Home 212 Washington Street, Gloucester. For online condolences, please visit http://www.greelyfuneralhome.com.

Gloucester Daily Times published the obit on April 27, 2020

Tributes for Nicky at St. Peter’s Club (Donations left at St. Peter’s club for covid-19 with tributes to Nicky since last week. His death came just shy of his 50th.)

 

Updated – with message from Rose

“It’s been so wonderful to see how the community of Gloucester has found their own ways to remember my cousin Nicky in an honorable manner. Seeing the flowers on the benches at the St. Peter’s Club, the flags flying at half mast in his rememberance, and the many nice things people expressed about him on Facebook or verbally, has been heart-warming during this difficult time for my family. What’s been lovely to hear or see are all the common themes expressed about my cousin Nicky ~ he had a huge heart, would do anything for anyone, and donned even bigger smile! Those sentiments mean so much to all of my family because they most certainly are true! Someone I was speaking to the other day said something that really clicked with me and choked me up a little and I thought it was truly special when she said, “You know Ro, Nick was like the son of Gloucester!”… I LOVED that because he loved going around town to visit with, chat with and have his espresso with people he truly cared about and enjoyed seeing. He did often drive around Gloucester and became a staple in many family’s homes or at the various wharfs around town, or the St. Peter’s Club, or Sebastian’s Pizza, or where ever he popped in to say hi, joke a bit, laugh a bit or just wanted to plain say hello to someone. When I think about it I can only smile because I guess all that matters is that it made my cousin’s day when he received the smiles back at him! R.I.P Nick Your hearty laugh and big smile was taken away much too soon from Gloucester!” 

 

“He Was the Type of Guy Who Would do Anything for You” Gloucester Daily Times, 4/22/2020 by Sean Horgan: Read the article here;  and another short piece by Horgan, with photos by Paul Bilodeau, also Gloucester Daily Times

Annisquam River dredging 2020: closeup views from the boats and across to A. Piatt Andrew bridge #GloucesterMA

Here are some views across Annisquam River to A. Piatt Andrew bridge to show relative scale and position of the Annisquam River Dredging operation in February 2020. The Annisquam River dredging project began back in October 2019 and will continue into next year, however it’s not continuous. It’s overseen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The first dredging sections began in October 2019 (north of the 128 bridge, by Lobster Cove and Thurston Point), and will finish up next Friday (February 28, 2020), following two extensions. Dredging will resume sometime in the fall, likely October 2020.  They’re moving in the direction of the Cut right now. The operations run 24 hours a day with two 12 hour shifts. There are lots of local hires manning the rigs. Cessation by Friday is definite. “There won’t be a third extension because of the flounder spawning season,” says Paul Vitale, captaining one of the push boats for Patriot Marine, a Coastline Consulting sub-contractor.

The equipment you might see before they begin disappearing by the end of this week  are the following:

  • Three barge dredges operating excavators; one is a self loader designed to go in spots where there’s not enough space (There’s still a chunk to do between the train bridge and the cut bridge. The self loader will be doing that.)
  • Three dump scows (also barges) where they put the mud that they load into and cart away to very specific dump sites in Ipswich Bay (they have 5 or 6 compartments and doors that open up on the bottom like coal cars)
  • Roy Boys and Nancy Anne, two tug boats that do the dump runs primarily to Ipswich Bay, carting the scows back and forth
  • Three push boats – two manuevering with each dredge plus one (to help move or ready if there’s a breakdown)

When the project is completed, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will remeasure and update charts. Buoys will be in new spots. But that’s still a long way off.  Fun facts: the scooped sediment was sandier by Thurston Point and muddier at the bend where they’re situated now. There are sensors and computers linked up on barges and scows for monitoring the dump runs, and future research and tracking. The grants obtained for this massive dig were written long before the March trio of storms struck Good Harbor Beach and Long Beach.

 

Closeup views from the barges and vessels courtesy photos below:

 

Mayor Romeo Theken shared the City of Gloucester dredging announcement here November 8, 2019.

About the dredging:

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New England District is proposing to perform maintenance dredging of the Annisquam River Federal navigation project (FNP) in Gloucester, Massachusetts. The city of Gloucester is the local sponsor and requested this dredging.

The proposed work involves maintenance dredging of portions of the 8-foot-deep Mean Lower Low Water (MLLW) channel and anchorage, plus authorized overdepth dredging in the Annisquam River FNP. 

“Natural shoaling processes have reduced available depths to as little as 1.0 foot in portions of the 8-foot MLLW channel and anchorage making navigation hazardous or impossible at lower stages of the tide,” said Project Manager Erika Mark, of the Corps’ New England District, Programs/Project Management Division in Concord, Mass. “Maintenance dredging of approximately 140,000 cubic yards of sand and some gravel from approximately 20 acres of the authorized project area will restore the FNP to authorized dimensions.”

A private contractor, under contract to the government, will use a mechanical dredge and scows to remove the material and then transport it for placement at the Ipswich Bay Nearshore Disposal Site (IBNDS) and the Gloucester Historic Disposal Site (GHDS). Approximately 132,500 cubic yards of sandy material will be placed at the IBNDS and the remaining 7,500 cubic years of sand and gravel material will go to the GHDS. Construction is expected to take between 3-4 months between Oct. 1, 2019 and March 15, 2020.

Proposed work is being coordinated with: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; National Marine Fisheries Service; Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management; Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection; Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries; Massachusetts Historical Commission; Massachusetts Board of Underwater Archaeological Resources; Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe; Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah); and city of Gloucester harbormaster. An Environmental Assessment is being prepared.

The public notice, with more detailed information, is available for review on the Corps website at http://www.nae.usace.army.mil/Missions/Navigation/Public-Notices/.

Native filmmaker, local fishermen | Dead in the Water at Cape Ann Cinema tonight

IMG_2121
photo: Wittkower filming at sea — with PAUL VITALE, GLOUCESTER

Tonight Cape Ann Cinema TUES. MAR. 20 @ 7:30PM

ed. note reposting:

David Wittkower’s full length documentary about the Gloucester fishing industry, Dead in the Water, was produced by Wittkower,  Linzee Coolidge, John Bell and Angela Sanfilippo. Music is by Paula Cole. LA based filmmaker, Wittkower, returned home to Gloucester, and was surprised by how different the docks were from the same ones he scrambled over as a kid. What happened? Prior local screenings were held at Rockport High School and Cape Ann Museum.

Dead in the Water documentary poster
Dead in the Water – the documentary, poster @GloucesterHouse “Fishermen have survived Nature’s fury at sea. But can they survive the Perfect Storm at home?”

Cape Ann Cinema Dead in Water

 

 

 

That’s a big movie poster! Dead in the Water Cape Ann Museum premiere

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from the Cape Ann Museum- Gloucester Screening set for “Dead in the Water” FEB 10

The Cape Ann Museum, in collaboration with the Gloucester Fishermen’s Wives Association,  is pleased to present “Dead in the Water”,  on Saturday, February 10 at 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.  The documentary film dealing with the devastating impacts of federal regulations on the lives of New England ground fishermen was produced and directed by Rockport native and professional filmmaker David Wittkower. A panel discussion with film participants will follow each showing. Tickets are $8 for Museum members and $10 for nonmembers. Reservations can be made at camuseum.eventbrite.com or call (978)283-0455 x10.

Two and a half years in the making, “Dead in the Water” is Wittkower’s fifteenth documentary film. It was shot in different coastal towns and features scenes and interviews with area fishermen, their spouses and other family members; advocates for fishermen; elected officials; and community activists.  “This film opens the doors for the world to see how difficult and dangerous the life of a fisherman is,” said John Bell, a former three-term mayor of Gloucester (2002 -08). “On top of that, the impact of misguided federal regulations on fishermen has never been presented as powerfully as it is in ‘Dead in the Water.’ This film packs a real punch. It stays with you long after you’ve seen it.” The film also includes the song, “Gloucester Harbor Shore” by Grammy® Award winner, Paula Cole.

Wittkower, a graduate of the American Film Institute in cinematography, describes “Dead in the Water” as an examination of the “relentless destruction of the New England ground

Continue reading “That’s a big movie poster! Dead in the Water Cape Ann Museum premiere”

Native filmmaker, local fishermen | Trailer for Dead in the Water – the documentary

David Wittkower’s full length documentary about the Gloucester fishing industry, Dead in the Water, was produced by Wittkower,  Linzee Coolidge, John Bell and Angela Sanfilippo. Music is by Paula Cole. LA based filmmaker, Wittkower, returned home to Gloucester, and was surprised by how different the docks were from the same ones he scrambled over as a kid. What happened? A local screening premiere is slated for Saturday November 18, 3pm, at Rockport High School. Tickets can be purchased in advance (978)282-4847.

IMG_2121

photo: Wittkower filming at sea — with PAUL VITALE, GLOUCESTER

Dead in the Water documentary poster
Dead in the Water – the documentary, poster @GloucesterHouse “Fishermen have survived Nature’s fury at sea. But can they survive the Perfect Storm at home?” 

Trailer

Gloucester Dragger Angela Rose Gets Offloaded at The Gloucester Seafood Display Auction

The noise you hear is the hydraulic pump which runs the winch.

Click the pic to view the video-

click to play video
click to play video