RIP Ken Joyce

2015- Carrancho reunion- Ken in the back wearing the festive party shirt

Gloucester native, FOB-

Condolences to Ken’s grieving family and friends. How painful that this beautiful family, the type of family that is everything to each other, has lost Ken. Smart. Humble. Joyful. And devoted to his family and Gloucester. RIP.

Kenneth S, Joyce Jr.

May 9, 1941 – March 19, 2022

“Born in Gloucester on May 9, 1941, he was the son of the late Kenneth and Esther (Vautier) Joyce Sr.

Ken was a graduate of Gloucester High School with the Class of 1959. Following graduation, he served in the U.S. Navy from 1960 to 1964, stationed on the destroyer USS Purdy working as a machinery repairman. His service on the Purdy included operations with other navy vessels implementing the Naval Quarantine in the Caribbean Sea during the Cuban Missile Crisis in November 1962.

After learning the trade during his navy service, upon his discharge Ken worked as a machinist for many years. He first worked at United Shoe Machinery, and then Gloucester Engineering, followed by Sinterbond. Ken then tried his hand at commercial fishing on Our Lady of Fatima, but…

Read the full obituary here

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in his memory to The Open Door, 28 Emerson Avenue, Gloucester, MA 01930 or the Lustgarten Foundation for Pancreatic Cancer Research, 415 Crossways Park Drive, Suite D, Woodbury NY 11797. Arrangements are by the Greely Funeral Home, 212 Washington St. Gloucester, MA. Online condolences may be given at: http://www.greelyfuneralhome.com

RIP Mary Rhinelander McCarl #GloucesterMA

Condolences to Mary’s family and friends.

Mary Rhinelander McCarl Obituary


Mary Frederica Rhinelander McCarl died of heart failure on Monday, June 7, in Gloucester, Mass., at age 81. Born on May 3, 1940, in Abington, Pa., to Constance Templeton Rhinelander and Frederic William Rhinelander, M.D., she came of age in Boston. A proud graduate of the Winsor School for girls in 1957, she finished her bachelor’s degree in history magna cum laude at Radcliffe College in 1961. Over the next three decades, she earned three master’s degrees, in history (Harvard), library sciences (Simmons College), and archival sciences (UMass/Boston). She also completed the coursework for two history doctorates: the first in medieval studies in the 1960s at Harvard, and the second in the 1980s and 1990s in the History of the Book program at Boston University.

She was a gifted cook and artist specializing in watercolors, acrylics, fiber art, and collage. She was also a published scholar. In her 1997 book The Plowman’s Tale, she proved that published versions of Geoffrey Chaucer’s fourteenth-century Canterbury Tales contained a forgery written by radical Protestants centuries later during England’s religious wars. Her articles on colonial New England include histories of Salem’s witchcraft crisis (1692) and medical knowledge. Her historical activism includes her leadership in funding restoration of Gloucester’s 1876 city hall building. In 2015, she won a Citizenship Award from the Gloucester Unitarian Universalist Church.

Her first marriage, to John S. C. (Jack) Morgan, ended in divorce. Preceding her in death are her parents; her brother, John B. Rhinelander; and her stepdaughter, Kathy Maisel. She is survived by her husband of 34 years, Henry Newton McCarl; her daughter, Francesca Morgan (Charles Steinwedel) of Evanston, Ill.; two stepchildren, Patricia McCarl (Sussi Shavers) of Atlanta and Fred McCarl (April) of Oneonta, Ala.; two brothers, Frederic W. T. Rhinelander (Patricia) and David H. Rhinelander (Ann W.), and sister-in-law Jeanne C. Rhinelander, all of Gloucester; ten grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews including Edward L. Widmer.

Her family will announce a memorial service in Gloucester at a later date. In lieu of flowers, please consider donations to the Constance T. Rhinelander Performance Fund, Sawyer Free Library, 2 Dale Avenue, Gloucester, MA, 01930, 978-325-5500. Please specify the Rhinelander Performance Fund on all checks. Arrangements by the Campbell Funeral Home, 61 Middle Street, Gloucester.

Nicolo “Nicky” Vitale Obituary | Gloucester Fisherman

Nicolo Nicky Vitale obituary

Nicolo “Nicky” Vitale obituary

Gloucester – In loving memory of Gloucester Fisherman Nicolo Vitale 49, who passed away on April 20, 2020 at Addison Gilbert Hospital.

Known fondly as Nick or Nicky to many, he was born in Gloucester, MA on April 24, 1970. He was the son of Maria (Groppo) Vitale and the late Giuseppe Vitale of Trappeto, Sicily.

He grew up in Gloucester until the early eighties before he moved to Trappeto, Sicily with his parents and his younger sister. He returned to Gloucester in 1988 where he remained living until the sea winds called upon him.

Nicky was a fisherman for most of his adult life. Nicky deeply enjoyed being a fisherman on the open ocean, especially with a crew of friends or family. Anyone that knew Nicky personally, was lucky enough to experience his hearty laugh and infectious and bright smile. He was always happiest when he was surrounded by his closest friends and family, as well as, making his rounds in visiting with people at a local coffee shop, or at the St Peter’s Club, or his favorite pizzeria or at someone’s house for espresso. He loved to joke around with the best of them and just cared to make people laugh and smile and enjoy each other’s company! Continuing with his Sicilian traditions always remained important to Nicky, such as being with family and friends for St. Joseph’s Day and the St. Peter’s Fiesta. No one can deny the enormous and genuine heart Nicky had; he would do anything for anyone if they asked or if he saw they needed help, he’d just jump right in, no questions asked!

In April 2001, Nicky earned his 100 – ton captain’s license, an accomplishment he was very proud of. In 2003, he earned his GED from Gloucester High School. Following his return back to the States, Nicky mainly built a life out at sea as a local fisherman and he fished on the following fishing vessels: Stella Del Mare, Angela & Rose, Christina Eleni, Miss Trish, Miss Sandy, Miss Trish II, Cathy C, Sabrina Maria, Razo, Kayla Maria, and the Helen S III.

He is survived by his loving mother Maria, sister Angela (Vitale) Regina, beloved nephew Antonio Regina who he adored with every fiber of his being, brother-in-law Paride Regina and maternal grandparents Giuseppe and Lucia Groppo, all of Trappeto, Sicily. He also leaves behind his Uncle Leonardo Vitale and aunt Rosalie, Uncle Pasquale Vitale and aunt Giovanna, Uncle Francesco Groppo and aunt Crocetta, all of Gloucester and Aunt Piera Vitale of Terrasini, Sicily. He will be remembered fondly by cousins Nicolo Vitale of Naples, FL and wife Angela, Rosa (Vitale) Geomelos of Danvers and husband Lenny, Paul Vitale of Gloucester and wife Justine, Angela Vitale of Gloucester and fiancé Rick, Nick Vitale of Gloucester, Fabrizio Vitale of Clearwater, FL and fiancé Sally, Maria (Groppo) Carpenter of Gloucester and Daniel, Enza Groppo of Gloucester, Nicolo Vitale of Brussels, Belgium and wife Enza, Mario Vitale of Terrasini, Sicily and wife Fanny and Daniele Vitale of Terrasini, Sicily and wife Gessica. He also adored his godchildren Kayla Collibee and Ava Vitale. He had many cousins, including in California, Germany and Sicily, and some wonderful friends that treated Nicky like family.

He is predeceased by his father Giuseppe Vitale, uncle Antonino Vitale, grandparents Nicolo and Angela Vitale, and cousin Angela A. Vitale.

Due to the COVID-19 Pandemic, visiting services with his family were held privately. A memorial mass and Celebration of Nicky’s life will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to Nick’s Fishermen’s Safety Fund through Cape Ann Savings Bank, 109 Main Street, Gloucester, MA 01930 to help provide personal safety devices to fishermen. Arrangements by Greely Funeral Home 212 Washington Street, Gloucester. For online condolences, please visit http://www.greelyfuneralhome.com.

Gloucester Daily Times published the obit on April 27, 2020

Tributes for Nicky at St. Peter’s Club (Donations left at St. Peter’s club for covid-19 with tributes to Nicky since last week. His death came just shy of his 50th.)

 

Updated – with message from Rose

“It’s been so wonderful to see how the community of Gloucester has found their own ways to remember my cousin Nicky in an honorable manner. Seeing the flowers on the benches at the St. Peter’s Club, the flags flying at half mast in his rememberance, and the many nice things people expressed about him on Facebook or verbally, has been heart-warming during this difficult time for my family. What’s been lovely to hear or see are all the common themes expressed about my cousin Nicky ~ he had a huge heart, would do anything for anyone, and donned even bigger smile! Those sentiments mean so much to all of my family because they most certainly are true! Someone I was speaking to the other day said something that really clicked with me and choked me up a little and I thought it was truly special when she said, “You know Ro, Nick was like the son of Gloucester!”… I LOVED that because he loved going around town to visit with, chat with and have his espresso with people he truly cared about and enjoyed seeing. He did often drive around Gloucester and became a staple in many family’s homes or at the various wharfs around town, or the St. Peter’s Club, or Sebastian’s Pizza, or where ever he popped in to say hi, joke a bit, laugh a bit or just wanted to plain say hello to someone. When I think about it I can only smile because I guess all that matters is that it made my cousin’s day when he received the smiles back at him! R.I.P Nick Your hearty laugh and big smile was taken away much too soon from Gloucester!” 

 

“He Was the Type of Guy Who Would do Anything for You” Gloucester Daily Times, 4/22/2020 by Sean Horgan: Read the article here;  and another short piece by Horgan, with photos by Paul Bilodeau, also Gloucester Daily Times

FILIPPO ZAPPA OBITUARY – GLOUCESTER’S FIRST LOSS OF LIFE TO COVID-19

Gloucester – Filippo Zappa 85, passed away April 5, 2020 at Beverly Hospital. He was the husband of Francesca Bologna Zappa, born in Terrasini, Sicily, to the late Antonino and Rosa (Scola) Zappa.
He was a fisherman for many years in Viareggio, Italy, then later in Gloucester for the remainder of his life. Filippo enjoyed being a fisherman on the Mother of Grace, Andromeda and Carol Ann, spending time with his family, tending to his garden, and walking the boulevard with his beloved wife Francesca. He was always happy and had a smile on his face that would light up the room. Filippo will forever be missed and will always be in our hearts.
He enjoyed spending his retired years helping out his son Peter at the Causeway Restaurant. He was always that smiling face greeting the customers. We will greatly miss his smile.
We love you dad till we meet again.
Filippo leaves behind his beloved wife, Francesca, and their four children, Rosa and her husband, Gino Mortillaro, Antonino and his wife Marianti, Salvatore and his wife Jackie, and Peter and his wife, Enza. He also leaves behind many beloved grandchildren, Michael Mortillaro and his fiancée Luara DeSilva, Filippo Mortillaro, Alias Mortillaro, Jacob Mortillaro, Francesca McLaughlin and her husband James, Lia Militello and her husband Santo, Rachael Daigle and her husband Matt, Rosa Khoury and her husband, Matt, Filippo Zappa, Antonino Zappa, Lisa Blanco and her husband, David, Dakota Zappa and his partner, Kayla Harris, Matthew Zappa, Filippo Zappa and his partner, Calvin Calhoun, Salvatore Zappa, Zachary Zappa, Leonardo Zappa and his fiance, Devon Harmon, Sonya Zappa, Filippo Zappa, Monique Zappa and Peter Zappa. Filippo was predeceased by a daughter, Rosa Zappa; and his siblings, Pietro, Stephine and Vittoria.
His funeral services will be held privately, Arrangements by the Campbell Funeral Home, 61 Middle Street, Gloucester. Information, directions, condolences at www.campbellfuneral.com.
To plant a tree in memory of Filippo Zappa, please visit HERE
Graveside Services to be held priavtely. A Funeral Service will be announced at a later date.

Obituary Val Babson

 Sending heartfelt condolences to the family and friends of Val Babson.

Mary “Val” Lavilla Cogswell Babson, 73, died July 30, 2019, peacefully at her home in Gloucester, MA, after years of enduring Alzheimer’s dementia. She died as she lived – full of grace, love, strength and beauty.

Born in Baltimore, MD, the day before Valentine’s Day, she was known to most as “Val” and to her grandchildren as “Tutu.”
Val adored her family and shared 47 loving years married to David E. Babson. They loved to travel but mostly enjoyed being at home together watching the tides come in and out of Lobster Cove. She always shared a vitality for life, a mischievous sense of humor, and boundless compassion and love for her many friends and family. We are all blessed to have her close to our hearts.

She graduated from the Friends School of Baltimore (1964), Wells College (1968), and Lesley University.
She was impassioned to improve the Gloucester Public Schools and contributed in a variety of roles by co-founding the Gloucester School Connection, helping to create the Multiple Intelligence Program, and working as the Public-Parent Information Director, Title I Liaison, and Community Outreach and Media Specialist.

She was an advocate for reading and building community, volunteering on the boards of the Annisquam Village Library and Sawyer Free Library, and always adding insight to her beloved book group. She got great joy from spending time in her beautiful garden and volunteered with the Garden Club of Gloucester. She also served on the board of the Gloucester Universalist Unitarian Church and was a docent at the Cape Ann Museum. For her years of dedicated service and leadership, she was recognized as a Paul Harris Fellow by the Gloucester Rotary, in 2013.

In addition to her husband, she is survived by her three children, David B. Babson and his wife, Annalei (McGreevy) Babson, and their children Kavika and Toni Rose, of Rockport; Amanda L. Babson of Narragansett, RI; and Warren C. Babson and his wife, Rachel Grinstead-Babson, and their children Winston and Cedarmae, of Gloucester; and her brother Corbin C. Cogswell, III and his wife Lynda W. Cogswell of Cape May, NJ.
She was preceded in death by her parents, Corbin C. Cogswell, Jr. and Mary (Chapman) Cogswell, of Baltimore, MD.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Gloucester Education Foundation, http://www.thinkthebest.org.

Funeral services will be held at the Gloucester Unitarian Universalist Church, 10 Church Street, Gloucester, On Saturday, August 3 at 11 a.m.
 
Following the service, relatives and friends are invited to attend a lunch collation in the church vestry.
 
Information, directions, condolences can be found at

Mary “Val” Babson Obituary

 Sending heartfelt condolences to the family and friends of Val Babson.

Mary “Val” Lavilla Cogswell Babson, 73, died July 30, 2019, peacefully at her home in Gloucester, MA, after years of enduring Alzheimer’s dementia. She died as she lived – full of grace, love, strength and beauty.

Born in Baltimore, MD, the day before Valentine’s Day, she was known to most as “Val” and to her grandchildren as “Tutu.”
Val adored her family and shared 47 loving years married to David E. Babson. They loved to travel but mostly enjoyed being at home together watching the tides come in and out of Lobster Cove. She always shared a vitality for life, a mischievous sense of humor, and boundless compassion and love for her many friends and family. We are all blessed to have her close to our hearts.

She graduated from the Friends School of Baltimore (1964), Wells College (1968), and Lesley University.
She was impassioned to improve the Gloucester Public Schools and contributed in a variety of roles by co-founding the Gloucester School Connection, helping to create the Multiple Intelligence Program, and working as the Public-Parent Information Director, Title I Liaison, and Community Outreach and Media Specialist.

She was an advocate for reading and building community, volunteering on the boards of the Annisquam Village Library and Sawyer Free Library, and always adding insight to her beloved book group. She got great joy from spending time in her beautiful garden and volunteered with the Garden Club of Gloucester. She also served on the board of the Gloucester Universalist Unitarian Church and was a docent at the Cape Ann Museum. For her years of dedicated service and leadership, she was recognized as a Paul Harris Fellow by the Gloucester Rotary, in 2013.

In addition to her husband, she is survived by her three children, David B. Babson and his wife, Annalei (McGreevy) Babson, and their children Kavika and Toni Rose, of Rockport; Amanda L. Babson of Narragansett, RI; and Warren C. Babson and his wife, Rachel Grinstead-Babson, and their children Winston and Cedarmae, of Gloucester; and her brother Corbin C. Cogswell, III and his wife Lynda W. Cogswell of Cape May, NJ.
She was preceded in death by her parents, Corbin C. Cogswell, Jr. and Mary (Chapman) Cogswell, of Baltimore, MD.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Gloucester Education Foundation, http://www.thinkthebest.org.

Funeral services will be held at the Gloucester Unitarian Universalist Church, 10 Church Street, Gloucester, On Saturday, August 3 at 11 a.m.
 
Following the service, relatives and friends are invited to attend a lunch collation in the church vestry.
 
Information, directions, condolences can be found at

MONARCH PROTECTOR LINCOLN BROWER DIES

By Matt Schudel WASHINGTON POST JULY 23, 2018
WASHINGTON — Lincoln Brower, one of the foremost experts on the monarch butterfly, who spent six decades studying the life cycle of the delicate orange-and-black insect and later led efforts to preserve its winter habitat in a mountainous region of Mexico, died July 17 at his home in Nelson County, Va. He was 86.

He had Parkinson’s disease, said his wife, Linda Fink.

Dr. Brower, who taught at Amherst College in Massachusetts and the University of Florida before becoming a research professor at Virginia’s Sweet Briar College in 1997, began studying the monarch butterfly in the 1950s.

He made key discoveries about how it protected itself by converting a toxic compound from its sole food source, the milkweed plant, into a chemical compound that sickened its predators, primarily birds.

Dr. Brower’s famous “Barfing Bluejay” photo of a bird wretching after eating Monarchs, proved Monarchs don’t tast good. Dr. Lincoln Brower photo.

In the 1970s, other scientists discovered that monarchs had extraordinary migratory powers, more like birds or whales than insects. Each fall, monarchs from east of the Rocky Mountains travel thousands of miles to a Mexican forest, where they spend the winters. Monarchs from western North America migrate to California.

‘‘It has the most complicated migration of any insect known,’’ Dr. Brower told the Chicago Tribune in 1998. ‘‘Somehow they know how to get to the same trees every year. It’s a highly specific behavior that is unique to the monarch butterfly.’’

It takes three to four generations of monarchs to complete the one-year life cycle. After the migration to Mexico, the butterflies begin their return trip to North America, and a new generation is born en route, growing from larvae to caterpillars before taking flight.

With the arrival of cooler weather in the fall, the great-grandchildren of the monarchs that flew south the previous year will make the same trip, returning to the mountainsides visited by their ancestors.

‘‘It’s an inherited pattern of behavior and a system of navigation that we don’t really understand,’’ Dr. Brower said in 2007. ‘‘We don’t know exactly how they find their way. We don’t know how they know where to stop.’’

Dr. Brower first visited the monarchs’ winter quarters in a Mexican forest, about 80 to 100 miles west of Mexico City, in 1977. At an elevation of 9,500 to 11,000 feet, tall fir trees were entirely covered by hundreds of millions of butterflies.

When they stir their wings, ‘‘it sort of sounds like leaves blowing in the fall,’’ said Dr. Brower’s son, Andrew Brower, a biologist and butterfly expert at Middle Tennessee State University, in an interview. ‘‘It’s remarkable. You look up, and the sky is blue, but then it’s orange. It’s like an orange stained-glass window above your head.’’

During more than 50 trips to Mexico to study monarchs, Dr. Brower began to see that their numbers were shrinking.

In North America, Dr. Brower also pointed out, the monarchs face a further problem from the growing use of herbicide, which has eradicated much of their food source, the once-abundant milkweed.

There are still millions of monarchs in North America, but their numbers fluctuate from year to year, in an ever-downward trend. By some counts, the population has fallen by as much as 90 percent since the 1980s.

Dr. Brower joined efforts by environmental groups to have the monarch recognized as a ‘‘threatened’’ species.

Lincoln Pierson Brower was born Sept. 10, 1931, in Madison, N.J. His parents had a nursery and rose-growing business. He was 5 when he took notice of an American copper butterfly landing on a clover bloom. ‘‘I just stared at that tiny butterfly, and it was so beautiful to me,’’ he told NPR. ‘‘And that was the beginning.’’

He graduated from Princeton University in 1952, then received a doctorate in zoology from Yale University in 1957. Some of his early scientific papers were written with his first wife, the former Jane Van Zandt. That marriage ended in divorce, as did a second, to Christine Moffitt.

Mr. Brower leaves his wife of 27 years, Linda Fink, a professor of ecology at Sweet Briar College and a frequent scientific collaborator; two children from his first marriage, Andrew Brower of Christiana, Tenn., and Tamsin Barrett of Salem, N.H.; a brother; and two grandchildren.

With President Jimmy Carter

READ MORE HERE:

https://texasbutterflyranch.com/2015/02/16/q-a-dr-lincoln-brower-talks-ethics-endangered-species-milkweed-and-monarchs/

https://monarchjointventure.org/news-events/news/remembering-lincoln-brower-a-world-renowned-monarch-conservation-leader

Dr. Lincoln

IN LOVING MEMORY OF MY FREIND AND MENTOR THOMAS EMMEL

This has been a stunning week for loss of life, with the suicide of Anthony Bourdain coming on the heels of Kate Spade’s suicide. Please dear hearts, no matter how depressed and overwhelmed, suicide is never, ever the answer. I learned several days ago that a friend passed away. I had the great fortune to travel with Tom Emmel in 2014 to the Monarch butterfly sanctuaries and we developed a lasting friendship. He shared information generously–it was his 44th trip to Angangueo–and he was one of the first scientists to study the Monarchs in their winter home. Tom leaves behind a lifetime of friendships as well as his legacy in research and conservation.

Tom loved the people and town of Angangueo; here he is in his element at the Sierra Chinqua Monarch Butterfly Reserve.

THOMAS EMMEL
CHADBOURNE PH.D
It is with great sadness that the family of Dr. Thomas C. Emmel announce his passing on Saturday, May 26, 2018, while traveling abroad in Brazil. He was 77 years old.
Tom is lovingly remembered by his brother, John Emmel (Phyllis), his nephew, Travis, and his niece, Alexis. In addition, a multitude of friends, colleagues and former students will forever honor Tom – a noted conservationist, naturalist, prolific author and visionary – for his kindness, humor, encyclopedic knowledge and wide-ranging interests. He epitomized the ideal of the professor as educator, mentor, supporter and inspiration.
Born on May 08, 1941, Tom grew up in Los Angeles, California. His parents, Edward and Ardyce Emmel, met on an outing sponsored by the Sierra Club and encouraged an interest in nature, including taking Tom and his brother on many camping trips to all the national parks in the western U.S. Around age eight, at the suggestion of his father, Tom, then younger brother John, began collecting butterflies on all their family trips. This began a lifelong passion they shared. Their mother further encouraged their interest by driving them to entomological society meetings at Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History. His parents, a den mother and scout master, respectively, were very much involved with the scouting program, and the brothers were Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, and Explorer Scouts, and became Eagle Scouts as well.
When Tom was a high school senior, he was one of 40 winners of the Westinghouse Science Talent Search, for which he won a trip to Washington, D.C. Upon graduating from high school, Tom went with ornithologist L. Irby Davis, for a three month trip to southern Mexico. Tom assisted Mr. Davis in recording bird songs in the early morning and evening, then collected butterflies during the mid-day. He returned to southern California with several thousand specimens – and his lifetime interest in tropical entomology was secured. As it would turn out, some of those specimens were representative of a new species – which in April 2018 was named Cyllopsis tomemmeli in his honor.
Tom earned his B.A. at Reed College in 1963. During the summer breaks from college, Tom was a nature counselor at Sanborn Western Camps for Kids, in Colorado. He earned his Ph.D. in Population Biology at Stanford University in 1967, and was a Post-doctoral Fellow in Genetics at the University of Texas from 1967-1968. His unbridled commitment to and support of the University of Florida began in 1968 when he joined its faculty as Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences & Zoology. In 1973, he became an Associate Professor of Zoology and three years later, in 1976, he became a Professor of Zoology. He served as department chairman for Zoology, directed the Department of Zoology Division of Lepidoptera Research from 1980-2003, and directed the UF Boender Endangered Species Laboratory since its inception in 1995.
In 2004, Tom was chosen to be the Founding Director of the Florida Museum’s McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity at the University of Florida. The McGuire Center was Tom’s vision and concept: A state-of-the-art research and teaching center that focused on Lepidoptera and the biodiversity they represent, and by extension a facility that engaged the public and created awareness of nature’s beauty and relevance to our lives. The Center was brought to fruition by the generous support of Dr. and Mrs. William McGuire, lifelong friends and admirers of Tom and his efforts. Under Dr. Emmel’s leadership, The McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity has become world-renowned for research on biodiversity, habitat loss, and Lepidoptera; a major publisher of related scientific studies; a force in public education about our environment and its biodiversity; and the repository for the largest collection of Lepidoptera specimens in the world
Tom authored more than 400 scientific publications, including 35 books. His many personal research interests included the endangered Schaus Swallowtail population in the Florida Keys; the effects of mosquito control pesticides on non-target wildlife and humans living in south Florida; microevolution, population biology, and ecological genetics of Cercyonis butterflies; chromosome evolution and macroevolution in the Lepidoptera; mimicry complexes in Mechanitis and Melinaea ithomiine butterflies in the Neotropics; biology, life histories, ecology, and conservation of the California butterfly fauna; fossil butterflies; and butterfly diversity in many areas of the world. He worked tirelessly to encourage efforts to promote conservation and natural habitat preservation, such as through the Miami Blue–Save Wild Florida license plate initiative and conservation biology efforts for the overwintering Monarch butterfly sites in southern Mexico. Throughout his lifetime, Tom mentored countless students – fostering and encouraging their careers in entomology, taxonomy, the study of tropical rainforests, and conservation biology.
Dr. Tom Emmel leaves behind a tremendous and unparalleled legacy. His vision, imagination, and energy in the service of conservation and Lepidoptera will continue to inspire and inform future generations of scientists, as well as the public in general. His life work contributed to making a better world, and the impact will be enduring.
In lieu of flowers, memorial donations in memory of Tom can be made to the Thomas C. Emmel Founding Director’s Endowment, which supports collections and research at the Florida Museum’s McGuire Center.
Funeral services and a celebration of life for Tom are to be announced in the near future.
Arrangements are under the care of MILAM FUNERAL AND CREMATION SERVICES 311 South Main Street Gainesville, FL (352) 376-5361 www.milamfh.com

Our Hearts and Prayers are with Judy, the Goetemann Family, and Rocky Neck Friends

 

1138821847-1Gordon Goetmann Obituary

Gordon Goetemann, 83, Educator, Painter, Rocky Neck Art Colony Community Activist, passed away peacefully at home on September 29.
To all who wander throughout the Rocky Neck Art Colony, the courtyard with yellow-cushioned wooden benches in front of Gordon and Judith Goetemann’s art gallery is a warm, welcoming place–a colorful thread in the tight-knit neighborhood, an inviting space for locals, tourists and art patrons from near and far to share low-key banter or debate the meaning of life.
Born and raised in St. Louis, MO., Gordon earned his BFA at Notre Dame and his MFA at the University of Iowa. During the summer of 1953, following his junior year at Notre Dame, he found his way to Gloucester where he studied under Umberto Romano, a formative experience which influenced his future works. It was also where he fell in love, with the dramatic light, the shoreline, the culture of Cape Ann, and with Judy Steele, a fellow Romano student who later became his wife and partner of 58 years. Together they raised 4 children.
In1977, Gordon and Judy opened the doors to their gallery at 37 Rocky Neck Ave, put the yellow cushioned chairs out, and joined one of America’s oldest working artist colonies.
Aware that the colony’s strength ebbed and flowed, Gordon became active in its steerage committee and dedicated himself to making the community strong and able to resist East Gloucester’s gentrification pressures.
He helped inspire key players to get involved in the creation of SeArts (Society of the Encouragement of the Arts on Cape Ann), the Rocky Neck Cultural Center and the Artist Residency Program at RNAC, renamed in 2010 in his honor. Thanks to their joint efforts, the Colony’s strength is flowing again.
Summers on Rocky Neck were the treat that followed 9 months of hard work teaching, painting until 3 a.m. and shoveling chest-deep snow drifts in St. Joseph, MN, where Gordon taught art history and studio courses at the College of St. Benedict and St. John’s University.
He was most fulfilled by his 40 year teaching career, working within a culture steeped in Benedictine values alongside many dear friends and colleagues. Former students would often recall that they had signed up for an easy course titled “painting”, then got bowled over by “the toughest class they ever loved”.
Gordon taught by example, challenging his students to live an “examined life”, to question and define their values, often within the context of their religious precepts, then create their artwork based upon what they had learned.Gordon’s studio contained as many papers filled with longhand notes on his philosophical queries as it did tubes of oil paint. He thought long and hard before he’d pick up the paint brush. Transfiguration of form and spiritual resurrection were common themes of study, examples being his Celestial Islands series and his magna opus on Gustav Mahler’s Symphonie II (Resurrection).
Though raised in a devout Catholic home, he was, at heart, a humanist, a moralist and a seeker of truth. Knowledge was a tool used to facilitate the examination process. And knowledge was a commodity Gordon rarely lacked — except when it came to the fate of his hallowed Notre Dame football team’s end-of-season scorecard, or the answer to the twelve letter word on 23 across, third and seventh letters being Q… (He loved his puzzles!)

Students who traveled with him to the Louvre, the Uffizi or the Prado would often try to stump him on the names of the most obscure paintings, to no avail. He’d name it, then study the work silently for a long minute and expound on the work’s uniqueness, origins and influence on movements to follow. He possessed encyclopedic knowledge and total recall, a pristine mind, even while his body was failing him.

Of his art, he told Art New England in an interview two years ago: “I always see myself as a synthesizer of the past, working to keep it vital in terms of contemporary culture,” he explained. “My expertise is in the history of the visual form. “There is no experience anywhere else that is like it. Love would be the closest comparison…it gives me a reason for living.”
Judy Goetemann and the neighbors invite all readers to come visit the galleries on Rocky Neck, have dinner, take in an event at the Cultural Center. While there, please come have a seat on the yellow cushioned benches and celebrate the spirit of the neighborhood, the Colony, and Gordon.
In addition to his wife, Judith Steele Goetemann, he is survived by his four children, Elizabeth Scholes and husband Garrett of Kittery Point, ME., David Goetemann of Gloucester, Mark Goetemann of Lincoln, Chris Goetemann of Gloucester; grandchildren Ava and William Scholes, Owen Goetemann, Theo and Adelle Goetemann; and his brother Gerald Goetemann of Parkersburg, W.V.
Visiting hours will be held Friday, October 7, from 4 to 7 pm at the Greely Funeral Home, 212 Washington Street, Gloucester.
A private family service will follow at the Greely Funeral Home on Saturday morning at 10:00 a.m.
A celebration of Gordon’s life gathering will take place at the Rocky Neck Cultural Center at a future date.
Contributions may be made in his memory to the Rocky Neck Cultural Center to support the Goetemann Artist Residency Program.
For online condolences, please visit greelyfuneralhome.com.

We’ve Lost A Great FOB- Tina Ketchopulos

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You may recall Tina took home the GMG PR Person Of The Year award back in March (Click the blue link for my glowing remarks about Tina)-

GMG PR PERSON OF THE YEAR- TINA KETCHOPOLOS

Posted on March 21, 2014 by Joey C 8 comments

Here were her words after learning about the recognition-

TINA KETCHOPOLOS RESPONDS TO HER BEST GMG PR PERSON OF THE YEAR AWARD

Posted on March 26, 2014 by Joey C 4 comments Edit Post

Dear Joey:

I want you to know how honored I am to be selected PR Person of the Year!

You know that GMG is my favorite blog – it is not only entertaining, but informative and educational! I appreciate the many health programs and screenings you post for us.

I feel like I have the best job in City.  I work at a wonderful hospital with amazing employees.  On Friday,

Cindy Cafasso Donaldson and her assistant, Deb Sacco, who I enjoy working with so much, told me to check GMG and that is when I saw the announcement.  What a way to begin your day! 

The co-workers I work with are incredible.  We have excellent doctors, nurses and support staff.

They are skilled and professional – but in addition, they are compassionate and caring and this is equally

important.  I feel honored to call these individuals my co-workers and  friends.  I wish I could name every department and

every employee as they deserve recognition as well.  Addison Gilbert Hospital is striving because of their good care and work.

So it is always a pleasure to share with you programming that our staff are conducting.

My job also allows me to work with so many agencies and other non-profits within the City – I have met so many wonderful people at meetings and working on projects together – this is one of the highlights of my job.

My boss Gerald MacKillop is from Gloucester and of course I told him I was bringing you to my next review!  I told him that when he called to congratulate me.

Please know that you made my day by your kindness and this wonderful honor; I am extremely grateful.

I have to go now, I have about four more notices to send you!

Gratefully and in friendship,

Tina


Here is her Obit from the Gloucester Daily Times(click this link for the entire obituary)

July 29, 2014

Tina Ketchopulos, 64

Rockport, MA — Mary C. “Tina” Ketchopulos, 64, died peacefully on Friday, July 25, 2014, at Addison Gilbert Hospital, surrounded by the comfort of her loving family and friends that she adored.