“Cape Ann & Monhegan Island Vistas: Contrasted New England Art Colonies” exhibition explores summer artistic havens that lured painters over the years

Exhibit travels from Maine to Massachusetts, Oct. 30, 2021 to Feb. 13, 2022

Don Stone, Dorymen, 1992

GLOUCESTER, MASS. (October 2021) – The growth of two of New England’s oldest and most revered summer art colonies will be the subject of a special exhibition, Cape Ann & Monhegan Island Vistas: Contrasted New England Art Colonies, opening Oct. 30, 2021 at the Cape Ann Museum. The show features works by artists who visited and were inspired by both places including Theresa Bernstein, Walter Farndon, Eric Hudson, Margaret Patterson, and Charles Movalli. It will be on view through Feb. 13, 2022.

Curated by art historian James F. O’Gorman, the exhibition was organized by Cape Ann Museum in collaboration with the Monhegan Museum of Art & History on the island of Monhegan in Maine. It is on view now in Monhegan until Sept. 30 before it moves to Cape Ann.

Monhegan and Cape Ann trace the roots of their respective art colonies back to the mid-19th century and specifically to the years immediately following the Civil War. Summer enclaves, which emerged during that time, gave artists the chance to socialize with one another, work together, share ideas, try out new techniques, and critique each other’s works.

Located 10 miles off the Maine coast, Monhegan is much smaller than Cape Ann and more isolated, however, both places offered their own vistas and many artists moved between the two colonies. During the 20th centuries, both communities saw a surge of artists, professional and amateur, visit their shores. Today, Monhegan and Cape Ann continue to be vibrant regional art colonies of national significance.

One of the artists featured in Island Vistas is Eric Hudson (1864-1932) who was an accomplished painter and photographer. An expanded collection of Hudson’s paintings will be on display in an adjoining gallery at the Cape Ann Museum, giving visitors the opportunity to delve deeper into his work.

The exhibition includes works from the collections of the Monhegan Museum of Art & History, the Cape Ann Museum, the Rockport Art Association & Museum, and private collections.

DROPBOX LINK TO HIGH RES IMAGES: https://www.dropbox.com/t/G4Mo6x00dSf68bcC

The Cape Ann Museum, founded in 1875, exists to preserve and celebrate the history and culture of the area and to keep it relevant to today’s audiences. Spanning 44,000 square feet, the Museum is one of the major cultural institutions on Boston’s North Shore welcoming more than 25,000 local, national, and international visitors each year to its exhibitions and programs. In addition to fine art, the Museum’s collections include decorative art, textiles, artifacts from the maritime and granite industries, three historic homes, a Library & Archives and a sculpture park in the heart of downtown Gloucester. In Summer 2021, the Museum opened the 12,000 square foot Janet & William Ellery James Center at the Cape Ann Museum Green. The campus also includes three historic buildings – the White-Ellery House (1710), the recently acquired Babson-Alling House (c.1740), and an adjacent Barn (c. 1740), all located on the site at the intersection of Washington and Poplar Streets in Gloucester. CAM Green is open Thursday through Saturday, 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. and Sunday 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 pm.

The Cape Ann Museum is located at 27 Pleasant Street in Gloucester and is open Tuesday through Saturday, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Sunday, 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Admission is $12.00 adults, $10.00 Cape Ann residents, seniors, and students. Youth (under 18) and Museum members are free. Cape Ann residents can visit for free on the second Saturday of each month

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