Thanks to James @eves3 and Anna @CapeAnnGiclee My Latest Work Is Hung @SeaportGrille

From the Cape Ann Giclee website:

 To order any of the prints hanging or others in various sizes on paper, metal or canvas please visit www.capeanngicleeshop.com  and look for Joey’s artist page under photography.  Use the discount code “Seaport” in the shopping cart for an exclusive Seaport Grille 25% discount on Joey’s work. If you have any questions about ordering please call or email Cape Ann Giclee 978-546-7070 /info@capeanngiclee.com

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GloucesterCast 152 With Guests @KimSmithDesigns, Toby Pett, David Emch and Host @Joey_C

GloucesterCastSquare

GloucesterCast 152 With Guests @KimSmithDesigns, Toby Pett, David Emch and Host @Joey_C

Topics include: David Emch’s www.captureamerica.co project, Local breakfast joints that provide an essence of the town, Fort Square Cafe, thanks to Jame and Anna Eves at Cape Ann Giclee as well as Sheree Zizak From Seaport Grille for making my photography show possible, Chief Len Campanello, The Preliminary Election Poll, Subplots of this election are fascinating, Pledge To Vote Post, Local Politicians Have Access To Lists Of Who Actually Votes and Doesn’t Vote In Local Elections, That Awkward Silence When Kim Can’t Figure Out How To Pause The Recording, Kim’s NEW FILM: Luminescent Sea Salps, Black Mass Mixed Reviews, Online Bully Pulpit, The second time Kim and Toby Struggle To Pause The Podcast Taping, Donna and Marty Covering The Gran Prix of Gloucester, The Monetary Impact That Events Like The Gran Prix of Gloucester Brings To Gloucester, Anthony Farenwald’s Documentary Past the Breakwater, Local Restaurant Groupons- Lobster Pool 50% off,Alchemy and Calas 47% Off, Bill Cox Pops In With A Phyllis A Update, Super blood Moon Lunar Eclipse on Sunday Night!

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NEW FILM: Luminescent Sea Salps

These salps were filmed in Gloucester’s inner harbor and had a luminous appearance in the blue lights of the fishing boat Hot Tuna, the largest boat in the Wicked Tuna fleet. I think the song “La Luna” by Lucy Schwartz adds to the magical movement of the salps and other creatures in the glowing blue. (So sorry to Captain Ott for startling him while hanging over the edge of the dock to film the salps at the rear of his boat, and Hey to Nicky Avelis!)

Sea salps are warm ocean water creatures, exploding in population during algae blooms. With beating heart, notochcord, and gills they are more closely evolutionarily linked to humans than to jellyfish. Sea salps are individual creatures that through asexual reproduction, can form linear chains up to fifteen feet long!

Salps are planktonic (free floating) members of the subphylum Tunicata. Tunicates get their name from the unique outer covering or “tunic,” which acts as an exoskeleton. The sea salp’s tunic is translucent and gelatinous; in some species it is tough and thick.

Capt. Pete Favazza – Ambassador of Gloucester Harbor

IMG_8192Captain Peter Favazza of the Miss Julian of Cape Ann Harbor Tours, is truly the Ambassador of Gloucester Harbor.

Capt. Pete enlightens his guests on the Miss Julian  of Gloucester Harbor, it’s history, the boats and the industries still found on the water front.  During the Schooner Festival he provides information about each schooner and it’s history.  Everyone that rides the shuttle Thank Capt. Pete and the crew of Miss Julian for a wonderful and fun summer of 2015.

 

 

 

Does anyone know anything about old model boats?

Terry Weber submits-

Does anyone know anything about old model boats?

This thing is practically a fossil, covered in dust, with no identifying marks on it that I can find except a possible faded British flag. 

Someone told me that it was not worth much, it was just a decorative piece, but I want to make sure before it goes in the yard sale bin. 

Thank you!

a boat 2boat close up 2boat flag 2

HarborWalk update few new signs replaced and repaired

Cat Ryan submits-

Hi Joey

News from the Gloucester HarborWalk. Over the last couple of days, you may have noticed that some of the permanent granite markers for the HarborWalk trail were shrouded. Replacement signs were required for some of the plaques. As with the original installation back in July 2012, new signs need a day or so to cure before they’re securely installed, hence the black plastic wrap. Sometime this morning they’ll all be unwrapped.

For the longest time there was really just one damaged sign, the map atop the Birdseye marker. It’s likely that one was yanked off, vandalized. The only one! I think that’s remarkable. Also, none of the signs were damaged by weather or general wear and tear. A couple had dramatic demises- backed into by a semi-truck, things like that. The rest suffered accidents similar to fences and curbs this past winter: snow removal required getting to places off the beaten track. A couple of signs we updated at the same time as the damaged ones. For instance the whale marker by Washington and Main had an illustration that was printed in reverse. We note changes over time. The raised symbols that people can trace and collect were installed two ways, both accepted practice and tested before. The one that seemed on paper to be the best process turned out not to be.

We’re pleased the signs are ready for Trails and Sails this weekend, Cyclocross and student field trips this fall. And for all the walkers. Currently there is one sign with some damage, the marker for Fitz Hugh Lane. If you notice other problems along the HarborWalk anytime, please email friends of the HarborWalk gharborwalk@gmail.com.

One-Day Art Installation at Historic White-Ellery House – Oct. 3

Insights On Site at the White-Ellery House

Life Observed – A one-day installation by Sarah Wonson

The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present Life Observed, an installation by Sarah Wonson on Saturday, October 3 from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. This program will take place at the Cape Ann Museum’s historic White-Ellery House (1710) and is free and open to the public as part of Escapes North 17th Century Saturdays. The House is located at 245 Washington Street in Gloucester at the Route 128 Grant Circle Rotary; parking is available off Poplar Street in the field behind the house.

unnamed-4Sarah Wonson, White-Ellery, 2014, woodblock print.

In Life Observed, Wonson’s interests in making art converge with her reverence for Colonial-period architecture. Returning home to Gloucester in 2011 after living away for eight years, Wonson began to take notice of the wealth of beautiful colonial-era homes around Cape Ann; each one with its own character, friendly, foreboding, comical, etc. “I wanted to learn more about Colonial period buildings,” states Wonson, “so I began visual research in The White Pine Series of Architectural Monographs.” These pamphlets, filled with atmospheric, shadowy black and white photographs of historic houses, captivated Wonson, and she has been drawing and contemplating them since. “[While] the formal aspects of the structures interested me initially, over time my focus has shifted towards the relationship between where we dwell and the human imprint we leave behind. The home is not just a building, it is a place where we store our experience.”

 

Last year, for a woodblock printing project called BIG INK, Wonson photographed the newly renovated diamond-paned windows at the White-Ellery House. “The White-Ellery [H]ouse fascinated me; the dark sturdy exterior, the visible construction and layers of ornamentation left behind on the walls, paint and wallpaper still evident from long ago … carpenter marks on the attic beams, evidence of a human hand long gone. [The] House … is empty, yet it feels full of experience.”  Having finished the woodblocks, she decided to work toward putting a show together at the White-Ellery. The result is a series of three dimensional representations of household objects that comment on the contemporary relationship of the home and the world at large. “Over time, the link between home, object and their utilities has been degraded.… When everything is disposable, when there is always another, why should we care about what we have?”

The White-Ellery House has served as the backdrop for a series of one-day contemporary art installations (Insights On Site) for seven years running. It was built in 1710 and is one of just a handful of First Period houses in Eastern Massachusetts that survives to this day. Unlike other structures of this period, the largely unfurnished house has had very few interior alterations over the years. Stepping inside today, visitors enter much the same house they would have 300 years ago.