Look What Andrea Holbrook Captured ~ A GLOSSY IBIS IN GLOUCESTER!

 

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Andrea writes, “OK , because of where I work — Gloucester — and amazing bird photos posted by friends — that would be you Kimberley Caruso and Kim Smith — I find myself stopping to shoot shorebirds with a camera. Spotted Thursday morning at Grant Circle, a glossy ibis and two snowy egrets. Not great photos but I had never seen a glossy ibis before!”

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Thank you so much Andrea for sharing your photos of the stunning Glossy Ibis. It’s breeding range in the Western Hemisphere is quite narrow and I would love, love to capture this species on film. Keeping my eyes peeled thanks to you!

From the Mass Audubon website, “In Ancient Egypt, ibises were venerated as sacred birds. They were believed to have a connection to the deity Thoth, the wise scribe and lorekeeper of the Egyptian pantheon. While Glossy Ibises are not literate, they are marvelous travelers. The Western Hemisphere population of this species represents a fairly recent arrival to the New World, believed to be descendants of birds who flew from Africa to South America in the early nineteenth century (Davis & Kricher 2000). Read More Here

 

8 thoughts on “Look What Andrea Holbrook Captured ~ A GLOSSY IBIS IN GLOUCESTER!

  1. Kim, we’ve seen a glossy ibis a few times at Magnolia Woods. In fact, one time I was watching one fly low through the swamp when it appeared to hit a tree–and fell. I’d never seen anything like it. Boom, down. I couldn’t see it after that. Michelle says she read that they nest on Kettle Island.

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    1. That must have been disconcerting to see that–you just assume birds don’t knock themselves out flying into trees. Thanks to Michelle for the info!

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  2. Here’s some vague information, sorry. I think it’s in August that I see a lot of them in one of the fields just outside, Essex, on Rte. 133. It’s either the field with a few horses or the one with the big red barn. They can be hard to spot, because they are so dark.

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  3. We have many this way now stocking the rice paddies that are flooded…Great shots! 🙂 Dave & Kim 🙂

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  4. I could be wrong but I do believe that I saw one in Rockport last weekend.I remember thinking what an unusual bird. I just love the colors.

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