First Civilian State Emergency Hospital Post and angel nurses from Ontario helped Gloucester fight back | 1918 influenza pandemic part 5

The United States reached a devastating milestone of 512,000 deaths claimed by Covid-19 on February 28, 2021. A year ago when I wrote about the impact of the 1918 Flu Pandemic through a Gloucester lens, the potential lethality of Covid-19 was sobering and hard to fathom. In modern times, deaths caused by Covid-19 in the United State could never climb as high as the 1918 Pandemic, right? Wrong. In this year of living grievously, 500,000 deaths is a grim new record. We are so deeply sorry to all who endure the loss of someone close, to long haulers struggling to heal, and to caregivers who face so much.


This excerpt has been adapted from The 1918 Pandemic: Reconstructing How the Flu Raged Then Flattened in Gloucester, Massachusetts when 183 Died in 6 weeks, by Catherine Ryan, March 2020. Posts like this one, Part 5, offer select weeks during the outbreak as serialized chapters.


September 20, 1918

As the death toll doubled, the local paper tried to keep pace with death notices and tributes. One week after an outbreak at the post office, the paper published an obituary for William L. Jeffery, the first local shop owner to die from influenza. His stationery store was located on Pleasant street, same as the Post Office. Another man known to many in town, George Goldthwaite, a salesman for the Gloucester Gaslight Company who acted in community theater, succumbed. “Only last July he took part in the play “Two Burglars and a Lady” at the Playhouse-on-the-Moors.”

Mr. and Mrs. Martin on Fort Square died from influenza within three days of each other. “The family came to this city a few years ago when the gill netter fishermen from Michigan took up their residence here.”

“The couple are survived by four children Violet, aged 9 years, Gladys, aged 7; Lilian, aged 5, and Delores, 3 years of age.”

Four orphans- sad death notice for Mr. and Mrs. Martin – September 20, 1918

September 23, 1918

On September 23, 1918 Boston reported 23 new deaths from influenza; Gloucester, 11.

At the post office where the disease had surged, nine staff still struggled. While letter carrier Hodsdon recovered from the malady, his wife Ethel (Wheeler) Hodsdon died at home.


September 24, 1918

Cases in East Gloucester ramped up September 24th. A few vessels returned with sick crew. Sawyer Free Public library closed. Physicians and nurses from other towns arrived to help. Polling locations were open for the primary, but voter turnout was the smallest on record. Church attendance was small, “on account of the large number of persons afflicted and those who kept away.”

There were so many new cases in Gloucester, officials enlarged the temporary Red Cross emergency hospital at the police station (and would again), clearing out the District Court floor.

Still, more hospital beds were necessary. The State Armory on Prospect Street seemed the ideal site to ready, however the State refused the request.

Alderman (City Councilor) Poole headed to Boston with Osborne Knowles, Christian Saunders and John Radcliffe, representatives from Gloucester’s Board of Health and Public Safety, to negotiate with state and federal officials in person.

“That the authorities were fully cognizant of conditions in Gloucester was evident from the statement of Mr. Long, who said that Revere, Quincy and Gloucester were the most infected of any in the state. Mr. Long offered the committee every assistance and relief that could be given to handle the situation
In the opinion of state officials and leading physicians the out-door method of treating the disease is the most effective and successful. So interested were the officials in the local situation that the surgeon-general’s department yesterday afternoon notified Capt. Carleton H. Parsons, senior officer of the local state guard units; instructing him to present to the local authorities the offer of the state to send to Gloucester a military hospital unit to cope with the situation.”

Lieut. John A. Radcliffe, State Guard, resident, and veteran Gloucester Daily Times (GDT) reporter of nearly 20 years & volunteer on the Board of Health for 15 prior to the pandemic

The state discussions prompted additional protective measures, informed by the best doctors in the armed services. There were more cases in Massachusetts by then than all the other states combined. Influenza cases at Camp Devens had already climbed to 11,000.

The Gloucester contingent left the Boston conference armed with a state of the art plan for a crisis team to be deployed in Gloucester: a military unit of doctors, nurses and multiple local State Guard companies. It would be the first one established for care of civilians.

All necessary presentations and votes were sorted by nightfall.

“The adjutant general’s department in Boston was immediately communicated with, and arrangements made to send tents, physicians, nurses’ field kitchen, military equipment and supplies to this city.”

John Radcliffe, Gloucester Daily Times

Meanwhile, another floor was added to the Red Cross Emergency Hospital, State Guard called out, and police instructed to enforce any Board of Health recommendations such as the anti-spitting rule and fruit stand closures. Various strict fumigation requirements were put into immediate effect and there would be no crowding on street cars. Police officers were dispatched to The Fort and to investigate sanitation conditions.

Without calling it a quarantine, mighty efforts to effectively shut Gloucester down ensued. Cancellation and support notices landed on the front page.

The City banned outdoor gatherings now, too. A women’s suffragist meeting and Liberty Loan rallies were among the first cancellations. Gloucester District Nursing Association sought volunteer drivers.  

“Gloucester calls her people to rise promptly to the emergency!” urged the Gloucester Daily Times Op Ed.

In local war news at this time, Gloucester advocates were seeking reimbursement from the federal government for vessels sunk by submarine– while pressing for flu support.

Statewide the precise number of infected cases was a guess at best. It would be a week before reporting deaths was required by state law, ten days after Gloucester so ordered.

September 25, 1918

Massachusetts established an Emergency Public Health Committee on September 25, 1918. Their first order of business was to ban all public gatherings especially in light of the upcoming liberty loan rallies and parades. It was suggested that the Federal Government was likely to take charge in Massachusetts as a war measure.

The State Board of Health published treatment guidelines the next day because of the scarcity of physicians and nurses, and push back after bans and restrictions, which Henry Endicott defended mightily:

“
There are undoubtedly towns and cities in the Commonwealth from which the influenza has not been reported, but of course we must face the fact that the chances are very much in favor of the spread of the disease. I urge such communities to assume their part of the common responsibility, and to act as if they were already in the midst of the epidemic.

The doctors and nurses of Massachusetts who are devoting themselves to the care of the sick in this emergency are all heroes and heroines, and many of them have paid the penalty. Not one of them, as far as I am aware, has shirked in any way; they have overworked; they are without sleep—yet, still they go on. Massachusetts can never repay its debt to this noble band of men and women. We are using every effort, both through the government and outside the State to get additional help for these people
 (Regarding) Cancellation of the Liberty loan meetings
 It will never be said of Massachusetts that she was so immersed in her own private troubles that she for one moment failed to heed the Nation’s call to practical service. Massachusetts must and will do her part.”

Henry B. Endicott, Chairman Massachusetts Emergency Public Health Committee, established Sept. 25, 1918

Dr. Kelley, Massachusetts Commissioner of Health and a member of the state’s Emergency Public Health Committee, reached out to U.S. Surgeon General Blue. The Federal government lent army and navy doctors to take over doctor assignments. Kelley appointed a nursing Commission and assigned Miss Billings from his department as chairman. They hired 100 nurses to serve in case of emergency in the Massachusetts State Guard. Fifteen were deployed to Gloucester.

“These nurses were given the rank and pay of Lieutenant. It is believed that this is the first time such rank and pay have been given to women in the United States
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The state assigned about 10 more registered nurses to Gloucester as well.

September 26, 1918

The federal government released a detailed “Influenza” circular September 26. By then forty percent of Gloucester’s telephone company were absent “on account of sickness either of themselves or relatives whose care is devolving upon them.” The Gloucester Manufacturing Company “closed their plant indefinitely,” and the Ipswich mills announced a shut down. There were 49 deaths in the city, up from 11 three days prior, among them Laura Silva, Alderman Silva’s sister, who died that morning from “pneumonia following an attack of the prevailing influenza.”

Acting Governor Coolidge appealed to the President, select neighboring states, and the Mayor of Toronto for physicians and nurses:

“Massachusetts urgently in need of additional doctors and nurses to check growing epidemic of influenza. Our doctors and nurses are being thoroughly mobilized and worked to the limit. Many cases can receive no attention whatever. Hospitals are full, but arrangements can be made for outside facilities. Earnestly solicit your influence in obtaining for us this needed assistance in any way you can.”

Governor urgent telegrams disseminated 9/26/1918

The notice was carried in the Gloucester Daily Times and national papers the following day. New York Herald led with the capture of 5000 Germans and Bay State Governor asking for help on the front page; the New York Times published a notice on page 6.

The local paper featured its editorial: If You Love Your Fellow Man Then Give Your Aid in this Crisis;

September 27, 1918

With no time to spare, the State Military Unit was installed on the grounds of Addison Gilbert Hospital Friday September 27, 1918, and completed before sundown Saturday.

“In a remarkably short space of time the tents were up and the unit well established, so that this afternoon it will be ready for patients. There are 100 tents for patients, each waterproof, provided with board floor, cot and other essentials for the proper care of the sick
The field hospital is a wonderful institution and shows in a large measure what the State Guard can be depended upon to bring about. Day and night the men have worked to put the hospital in shape and to look out for the sick ones. It is simply remarkable the way the many details have been arranged to establish such a wonderful institution well worthy of the name. Electric lights, water, sewerage and floors in the tents have all been put in, chiefly through the efforts of the fine types of men that compose the State Guard.”

John Radcliffe, GDT

Another 100 tents for the state guard, plus any necessary for administration and operations, were installed as well.

Over on Main Street, the Red Cross established a children’s hospital in the Girl’s Club over Gloucester National Bank.

Anticipating great need, the public safety committee announced an Emergency Fundraising drive for the Local Red Cross administered by Cape Ann Savings Bank.

The Mayor and all but one Alderman were struck by flu—all those meetings! — and still that Monday they brought forth more precautions, seizing any and all educational opportunities and community measures possible to halt the spread. Public funerals were banned and soda fountains closed, though the latter was rescinded in one day.

Detailed flu mask (face masks) instructions were published as part of optimum patient care and prevention.

Mayor Stoddart urged fresh air and ventilation.

“Every house whether a case of disease has existed or not, should be thoroughly aired during the day
Clean up the back yards, dumps and filthy places. If your neighbor will not act, consult the Board of Health or its emergency agents and prompt action will be taken. Let everyone co-operate and assist our health officials in the excellent work they are doing.”

Mayor Stoddardt, September 30, 1918
Mayor John Stoddart served 1917-19

The deadline for the Draft Registration questionnaire was postponed until a future time when influenza was vanquished. One bright note that bleak weekend: ten “angel” nurses arrived from Ontario, Canada, and five from the state thanks to the commonwealth’s plea and Gloucester’s hustle. Unlike other locations during the 1918 Flu Pandemic, folks rushed here to help rather than away.

Continue reading “First Civilian State Emergency Hospital Post and angel nurses from Ontario helped Gloucester fight back | 1918 influenza pandemic part 5”

I Am More Project at the Cape Ann Savings Bank

I Am More at Cape Ann Savings Bank

 Fourteen pastel and colored pencil I Am More portraits by Amy Kerr, featuring many Cape Ann residents, can be seen at Cape Ann Savings Bank during the month of May in their beautiful gallery space. The portraits are accompanied by essays by the subjects about how they are more than their life challenges, including grief, mental illness, addiction, and dysphoria. There are resources available at the display from local non-profits detailing free support groups and services in Cape Ann.

 Special thanks to Bob Gillis, Jennifer Orlando, Steve Goodick, and everyone at Cape Ann Savings Bank for welcoming the display.

 To see all of the I Am More portraits and essays, including 18 new ones from around the state go to www.amykerrdraws.org.

 

 

 

“HOLIDAY DELIGHTS” FULL LENGTH VIDEO FROM HEIDI DALLIN’S YOUTH ACTING WORKSHOP – VIDEO BY LISA SMITH

With tremendous thanks to Heidi Dallin, creator, producer, and director of the fabulous “Holiday Delights.” Every year “Holiday Delights” charms the community with the talented cast of actors from Heidi’s Gloucester Stage Youth Acting Workshop. Thank you to Lisa Smith for sharing the video with the community. Special shout out given by Heidi to the show’s sponsors: Cape Ann Savings Bank, Bank Gloucester, New England BioLabs, David Robinson, Daniel Lee, and Anonymous donors. 

Hannah Kimberly at Gloucester House | Cape Ann Chamber Businesswomen’s Fall Event

Full house for author Hannah Kimberly’s talk at the 2017 annual Cape Ann Chamber Businesswomen’s signature fall event. Gloucester House is such a generous community venue. This stack of  A WOMAN’S PLACE IS AT THE TOP  hardcovers was GONE before the event was over, sold out by Charlie from the Chamber.

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Jenn Orlando, Cape Ann Savings Bank, chairs the Chamber’s businesswomen committee which oversees the Carolyn O’Connor Scholarship along with fostering connections through outreach like this Fall event. Orlando and Sara Young, President of the Chamber and director of Schooner Adventure, welcomed the guests and introduced featured speaker, Hannah Kimberly. Kimberly recounted tales and her rediscovery of 19th century feminist and adventurer, Annie Smith Peck.  Mayor Romeo Theken praised the writer, and was pleased that other Mayors are discussing this wonderful new book. She can relate! Kimberly shared a particularily competitive bit between the subject, Annie Peck Smith, and a famous male contemporary. (You’ll have to read the book to find out!) I will note that my table discussed that face-off sounding like a Bobbi Riggs vs Billie Jean King story of its time. Kimberly is working on a new book AND there is a documentary film in the works about Annie Smith Peck, the subject of  A Woman’s Place is at the Top. 

from the Chamber- Businesswomen’s Events – Through the year, the Chambers Business Women’s Committee puts together a number of mixer, luncheons and other events geared towards the business women on Cape Ann.  Proceeds of these events help to fund the Carolyn O’Connor Scholarship Fund, which is given each year to a recipient who is looking to change career paths or re-enter the workforce.

Gloucester’s Stage Fort Park is spectacular | historic photos and summer concert series

Here are some scenes from July 23rd  during the 4 Ever Fab Beatles nicely played tribute band evening sponsored by Cape Ann Savings Bank, part of the 2017 line up for the annual Stage Fort Park summer concert series at the Antonio Gentile Bandstand. See the full 2017 schedule here  The crowd brought chairs and blankets. What a venue!

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Stage Fort Bark summer concert series beatles tribute band July 2017

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We walked to Stage Fort Park from City Hall and could hear 4 Ever Band on the approach from the Boulevard, and later Tablet Rock where we settled in with a picnic dinner. The band sounded great!

Here’s Stage Fort Park in 1901 with it’s grassy meadow expanse.

Thomas Warren Sears stage fort park!

 

When you zoom in you can see the big ‘Battery K’-  for the Civil War 1861 to 1865 Fort Conant.

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And this weekend.

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Here’s a gorgeous aerial photo from the 1907 Tablet Rock dedication. There are several modes of transportation by land and sea. The well worn road was ground in from years of steady use, carriage trade and automobiles in this picture. The road is still prominent today.

tablet rock gorgeous

Note the tents in this one.

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Here’s another angle and a closer picture from the ground

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John Hays Hammond, Sr. with his daughter Natalie (not looking happily back at the photographer). She pulled back the cord for the reveal. Hammond orchestrated and compelled the press coverage.

I’ll go into more details about the commission with Part II.

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Here’s a detail of the plaque in 1907

detail from 1907 opening

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Disney’s MOANA tonight Gloucester HarborWalk Summer Cinema

July 19 ::: Disney Moana
July 26 ::: Rogue One Star Wars Movie
August 2 ::: Lego Batman Movie
August 9 ::: The Princess Bride
August 16 ::: Sing!

Mayor Romeo Theken hopes everyone is marking their calendars with Gloucester’s summer events! The outdoor movie series is curated and presented by Rob Newton Cape Ann Community Cinema and Stage. North Shore Radio 104.9 provides pre-show activities. Arrive at dusk. Bring your own picnic dinner, take out, or buy from vendors on site.

Thanks to the sponsors: “This year’s HarborWalk Summer Cinema is supported by many businesses in our community. Thank you Cape Ann Savings Bank, our Green Carpet Sponsor, and Doyon’s Appliance, Foster’s Grill Store and North Shore Navigators, our series sponsors. Also thanks to our nightly partners: National Grid, First Ipswich Bank (Moana), Building Center Stores, 7 Seas Whale Watch, Toodeloos! and Atlantic Vacation Homes | AVH Realty, Inc.”

HarborWalk Summer Cinema 2017 poster

Mayor Romeo Theken can’t wait! UU Gloucester Meetinghouse Summer Concert Series resumes July 7th!

FREE! “Nine Friday Nights. Nine Great Outdoor Concerts to benefit nine local non-profits.” 

Mayor Romeo Theken likes to remind everyone that “There’s always something going on in Gloucester!” including all the free performances for most every Gloucester Summer Night. 

Gloucester MA Free Outdoor Performances Daily
Mondays farmers market Magnolia
Wednesdays HarborWalk Summer Cinema Cape Ann Community Cinema and 104.9
Thursdays Farmers Market at Stage Fort Park and Harbor Loop summer concert series
Fridays Meetinghouse Green concert series United Universalist Church
Saturdays Main Street Block Parties Cape Ann Chamber
Sundays Stage Fort Park concerts at the bandstand

Gloucester Meeinghouse Foundation announces their 2017 line-up

UU summer 2017

First up Berklee Be-Bop Guitars on July 7 to benefit Pathways for Children

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From Gloucester Meetinghouse printed matter:

“The Gloucester Meetinghouse Foundation is pleased to announce the return of the free, outdoor concert series ‘Music on Meetinghouse Green’​ starting with the Berklee ensemble Be-Bob Guitars to benefit Pathways for Children on Friday evening July 7th.  

Mayor Romeo Theken regrets missing the 2017 kick off concert due to a prior family commitment,  and  she’s ever thankful that this fantastic series at such a grand and special venue is continuing after the pilot program last season! She’s asked Ward Councilor Melissa Cox to be on hand to open the first event. Mayor Theken is especially calling out old friends to come downtown to the old stomping grounds for all of them…especially August 11th!

July 7::Berklee Be-Bop Guitars
July 14:: Peter Souza, 3 Sheets to the Wind
July 21:: Melanie Bresnan & Friends
July 28:: Willie Alexander’s Persistence of Memory Orchestra
August 4:: Gordon Michaels
August 11:: Scanzonati Band
August 18:: Hye Fusion

So don’t miss the second season of Music on Meetinghouse Green featuring 9 great musical events in support of 9 terrific local non-profits via free-will offerings (please bring a folding chair, blanket, cash or check).  Shows start at 6:00pm and run until 8:30pm.  In case of inclement weather events will be held inside the historic 1806 Meetinghouse at the corner of Church and Middle Street.

The sponsors of ‘Music on Meetinghouse Green’ pre-pay the expenses so all contributions go to our non-profit partners.  Special thanks to Linzee & Beth Coolidge (matching gift) plus Tom & Susan Andresen, J.J. & Jackie Bell, Michael & Mary Ann Bresnan, Harry & Mary Hintlian, Dick & Doris Prouty, Charles Nazarian, Sandra Ronan, and our corporate sponsor: Cape Ann Saving Bank.”

More info:  www.gloucestermeetinghouse.org
Continue reading “Mayor Romeo Theken can’t wait! UU Gloucester Meetinghouse Summer Concert Series resumes July 7th!”

43rd Senior Care Meals on Wheels fundraiser buffet breakfast at Gloucester House

Many familiar faces and organizations came together in support of Senior Care’s Meals On Wheels, and showed up early to help host a festive and delicious event. We enjoyed sharing a table with staff from Cape Ann Savings Bank,  GoldenLiving Center, and Betty and John Erikkala from Lanesville. The Valentine’s Day fundraiser buffet breakfast was pushed back to March 10 due to the winter storm. March being March it was lightly snowing when we left.

 

I missed John and Betty Erkkala’s Souvenirs of Lanesville talk at Cape Ann Museum about their new book, but noticed the pocket ornament. The book is  available at the museum shop. Our marvelous city archives were mentioned once or twice!

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Custom place mats gave thanks for the wonderful sponsors. You’ll recognize people in the photographs affiliated with these organizations and businesses.

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Crane on Main. Charles Fine Arts @196 Main Street now open. Downtown artist and artisan rental options.

Updates on Main Street:

The roof replacement is underway at the Gloucester police station. The crane is lifting supplies.

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196 Main Street went from this

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to this

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Charles Fine Arts at 196 Main Street opens with ‘The Friends and Family Show’, a group exhibit displayed until September 24th, by appointment. Artists studios are available to rent. http://www.charlesfinearts.com

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Artist and artisan studio and gallery spaces:

For over 25 years, artists have pooled together to rent gallery space at Local Colors 121 Main Street. Established in 1978, the gallery operates as a co-op, sharing resources and all operations and administrative duties. They are the staff so there is always an artist on hand! The monthly rent split among the invited artists is modest as Cape Ann Savings (109 Main Street) owns the building and is a stalwart community and arts supporter. The roster is full right now.

Gallery display of another sort is part of goodlinens plans for 130 Main Street and will be installed along the right wall as you enter (photo below was looking left). A curated small selection of artisans will be invited to rent on a monthly basis for a modest fee. Owner Jo Anne Chirico designed special matrices currently in stages of fabrication. Look for three artisans in focus by October.

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Finding Nemo fun at HarborWalk Summer Cinema

What a treat! I wish everyone could have heard the hundreds of happy cries of  “Mine. Mine. Mine.” with each unforgettable Finding Nemo seagull scene. This was real life surround sound right at Gloucester’s harbor, seagulls aloft and searching in the enveloping night.

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6pm–hundreds more will stream in before the movie starts!

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Aurelia Nelson 104.9 Gloucester HarborWalk Summer Cinema 2016

 

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Gloucester HarborWalk Summer Cinema 2016 Awesome vendors

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OPEN DOOR at Gloucester HarborWalk 2016 Summer Cinema, with pre movie family activities and canned food drive. Finding Nemo sponsor

Thanks Rob, Cape Ann Community Cinema & Stage, for the community movie nights and for taking these photos. I didn’t bring my camera and was too busy eating even if I had!  What did we carry in and carry home?  On the way to the movies, we walked over to purchase delicious take-out subs from Leonardos for a picnic, and bug spray (not needed it turned out) and sundries from Walgreens. From the vendors at the outdoor movies we picked out candy, Kettlecorn and slush. We didn’t have the fried dough but there’s always next week!

Finding Nemo was the second movie of five FREE outdoor movies hosted by the City of Gloucester HarborWalk through the Cape Ann Community Cinema. Aurelia from North Shore 104.9 and Open Door hosted the festive pre-screening gathering.

The three premier sponsors for the HarborWalk Summer Cinema are North Shore 104.9, Cape Ann Savings Bank, and North Shore Community College. Finding Nemo was presented by Open Door. Next week’s Minions will be shown thanks to Toodeloos!

Continue reading “Finding Nemo fun at HarborWalk Summer Cinema”

MagnoliaCast Podcast with Guest Randy Oneil and Host Joey Ciaramitaro Taped 8/10/14

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MagnoliaCast Podcast with Guest Randy Oneil and Host Joey Ciaramitaro Taped 8/10/14

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Topics Include:

Featuring Gloucester Sports Legend Randy Oneil, International Dory Racing, 2014 Magnolia Road Race, www.magnolialibrary.org,The 525,The Village Restaurant, Wenham Train Museum, Halibut Point Chowder, Sidewalk Bazaar, Palazolas Sporting Goods,

Go to www.magnolialibrary.org to register and get in on the Dry Fit shirts for the race before they run out.

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Magnolia Road Race Sponsors:
Cape Ann Savings Bank
Jim’s Bakery
Stop & Shop
Daymark
Machine Tech
Rock the Baby
Innovation House
Freedom Fitness
525 Restaurant
Rooter Man
Cape Ann Auction
O’Hara Industrial Services
Harmony Barre

Thursday Toy Drive 6AM – 6PM ~ 3 Cape Ann stops with live music ~ Come donate a toy!

Special appearances by Chelsea Berry at the MAC (2 – 3 PM), Alexandra Valenti @ Shalin Liu (3:30 – 4:30 PM) and Allen Estes at Cape Ann Savings Bank (5-6 PM).  See full schedule below!
Toy Drive Poster

THEN and NOW – Main Street (1873)

Before photo and information Submitted by Fred Bodin:

51 Main Street (Cafe Bishco is there now).

West End of Main Street buildings, including the Cape Ann Savings Bank and the YMCA.

The second floor of the bank building became Gloucester’s first YMCA in 1858, one of the oldest Y’s in the U.S. The first YMCA was established in Boston in the Old South Church.

 

YMCA

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“This Is Gloucester” DVD Deposit For Rebuilding The Greasy Pole Complete

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To those of you who bought This Is Gloucester DVDs, 5% of sales went to the Rebuild the Greasy Pole Fund.  There are a few people who haven’t paid for theirs but I included the 5% for those sales even though the dough didn’t come in just to be done with it and have it all off my plate and enjoy the holiday. 

The last DVD’s went in the mail this morning and I’d like to extend a huge thanks to the nice lady at The Gloucester Post Office on Dale Avenue who was very helpful in giving me suggestions and super patient with me at the counter.  They are very pleasant at the Post Office even in the heart of the shipping season. 

You can still donate if you would like to rebuilding the Greasy Pole.  Anyone  looking to donate to the restoration can send a check to Greasy Pole Fund, care of Cape Ann Savings Bank, 19 Main St., Gloucester 01930, or designate the check for the Greasy Pole Fund and send it to the St. Peter’s Fiesta Committee, P.O. Box 3105, Gloucester, 01930.

Video Interview- Local Banking Part I A Conversation With Bob Gillis

People like to speak about shoping locally.  Often times they are talking about retail shopping or buying local fish, lobsters, produce and sourcing food as close to home as possible.

What often gets overlooked are our local banks who have in the past and are currently, extremely involved in our community.  Not only do they provide local jobs but more often than not they keep the money that you save as deposits here and turn around and lend that money back into the community.  They also back many local charities and treat you as a person and not just an account number.  It’s nice to have someone recognize you when you walk through the doors.

I don’t always advocate to do business locally.  I’ll be the first to admit that if there is an item out of town where there is a huge discrepancy in price I will shop out of town.  However when things are close to even slightly higher priced the benefits of keeping it local go way beyond what you put in your pocket.  There is a ripple effect where the entire community benefits.

We highlight the benefits of local banking in light of the fee based banking structure of large national banks.  Here is part I with Bob Gillis Of Cape Ann Savings Bank.

When you get your Bank of America statement this month and decide that you’ve finally had enough, check out what our local banks, Cape Ann Savings Bank, Bank Gloucester and Rockport National have to offer.   I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised.

…and don’t forget to tell ’em Joey sent ya.

Look for my interview with Patrick Thorpe From Bank Gloucester tomorrow.