Gloucestercast 220 With Kim Smith and Joey Ciaramitaro Taped 2/27/17

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Gloucestercast 220 With Kim Smith and Joey Ciaramitaro Taped 2/27/17


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Oscars- Kate says she hates award shows.  I love watching them.  Although swearing that she hates them she was riveted to the pre-show.  Then we turned it off and missed this
Oscar fashion Joey Gives thumbs up to Taraji P. Henson and Hailee Steinfeld
Kudos To Meg Montagnino for her work involved with the Filming of Manchester-By-the Sea
Rosie is sick
Pier 23 Kitchen
David Joyner named executive editor for North of Boston Media Group.  Shout out to Andrea Holbrook and Gail McCarthy
Turkey Watch Good Harbor Beach Marsh

TURKEY BROMANCE

eastern-wild-turkey-males-gloucester-ma-6-copyright-kim-smithConferring

From far across the marsh, large brown moving shapes were spotted. I just had to pull over to investigate and was happily surprised to see a flock of perhaps a dozen male turkeys all puffed up and struttin’ their stuff. I headed over to the opposite side of the marsh in hopes of getting a closer look at what was going on.

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Turkey hen foraging 

Found along the edge, where the marsh met the woodlands, were the objects of desire. A flock of approximately an equal number of hens were foraging for insects and vegetation in the sun-warmed moist earth.

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Males begin exhibiting mating behavior as early as late February and courtship was full underway on this unusually warm February morning. The funny thing was, the toms were not fighting over the hens, as you might imagine. Instead the males seemed to be paired off, bonded to each other and working together, strategically placing themselves in close proximity to the females. A series of gobbles and calls from the males closest to the females set off a chain reaction of calls to the toms less close. The last to respond were the toms furthest away from the females, the ones still in the marsh. It was utterly fascinating to watch and I tried to get as much footage as possible while standing as stone still for as long as is humanly possible.eastern-wild-turkey-males-gloucester-marsh-copyright-kim-smith

With much curiosity, and as soon as a spare moment was found, I read several interesting articles on the complex social behavior of Wild Turkeys and it is true, the males were bromancing, as much as they were romancing.

Ninety percent of all birds form some sort of male-female bond. From my reading I learned that Wild Turkeys do not. The females nest and care for the poults entirely on her own. The dominant male in a pair, and the less dominant of the two, will mate with the same female. Wild Turkey male bonding had been observed for some time however, the female can hold sperm for up to fifty days, so without DNA testing it was difficult to know who was the parent of her offspring. DNA tests show that the eggs are often fertilized by more than one male. This behavior insures greater genetic diversity. And it has been shown that bromancing males produce a proportionately greater number of offspring than males that court on their own. Poult mortality is extremely high. The Wild Turkey bromance mating strategy produces a greater number of young and is nature’s way of insuring future generations.

The snood is the cone shaped bump on the crown of the tom’s head (see below).eastern-wild-turkey-male-snood-caruncles-gloucester-ma-2-copyright-kim-smith

The wattle (or dewlap) is the flap of skin under the beak. Caruncles are the wart-like bumps covering the tom’s head. What are referred to as the “major” caruncles are the large growths that lie beneath the wattle. When passions are aroused, the caruncles become engorged, turning brilliant red, and the snood is extended. The snood can grow twelve inches in a matter of moments. In the first photo below you can see the snood draped over the beak and in the second, a tom with an even longer snood.

eastern-wild-turkey-male-close-up-gloucester-ma-copyright-kim-smithIt’s all in the snood, the longer the snood, the more attractive the female finds the male.

eastern-wild-turkey-male-snood-extended-carnuckle-gloucester-ma-10-copyright-kim-smith

eastern-wild-turkey-male-gloucester-ma-copyright-kim-smitheastern-wild-turkey-male-gloucester-ma-9-copyright-kim-smithMale Turkey not puffed up and snood retracted.

A young male turkey is called a jake and its beard is usually not longer than a few inches. The longer the beard, generally speaking, the older the turkey.eastern-wild-turkey-male-beard-gloucester-ma-copyright-kim-smithMale Wild Turkey, with beard and leg spurs.eastern-wild-turkey-males-snood-extended-retracted-gloucester-ma-copyright-kim-smith

Male Wild Turkeys with snood extended (foreground) and snood retracted (background).

eastern-wild-turkey-male-tail-feathers-gloucester-ma-copyright-kim-smithWhen the butt end is prettier than the face

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In case you are unsure on how to tell the difference between male (called tom or gobbler) and female (hen), compare the top two photos. The tom has a snood, large caruncles, carunculate (bumpy) skin around the face, and a pronounced beard. The hen does not. Gobblers also have sharp spurs on the back of their legs and hens do not.

 

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Read more here:

http://www.alankrakauer.org/?p=1108

http://www.berkeley.edu/news/media/releases/2005/03/02_turkeys.shtml

http://www.mass.gov/eea/agencies/dfg/dfw/fish-wildlife-plants/wild-turkey-faq.html

A GLORIOUS GOOD MORNING GLOUCESTER TO YOU!

Brought to you by Mr. Swan –

We’re happy to see our buddy surviving the winter without too much ado (except when he got himself frozen solidly into the ice).

A friendly note to folks who would like to visit Mr. Swan. He is very shy around dogs so perhaps leave your furry companion in the car. And if you plan to feed him, please, please only whole corn or shredded veggies (swans don’t have teeth, so no large chunks). Junk food is a killer and weakens their bones.

mr-swan-mute-swan-cygnus-olor-copyright-kim-smithMr. Swan doing his morning exercises.

Call out for vendors

Hi all:
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The Magnolia Historical Society is having another Art in the Schoolhouse in April. If you are interested in becoming a vendor please follow the link below
http://www.loveislivinginmagnolia.com/

Click on the More tab and register for the show. Also please fill out the attached Inventory Sheet. mhs_artshow2017inventorysheet

If you need more information please let me know and I can help. This event is always fun and successful.

Thanks kids

242 Main Street: new women’s wellness space Phia opens March 11

Coming soon to Main Street!

Laura Tanguay is opening Phia Women’s Center at 242 Main Street, Gloucester, MA. Grand opening March 11, 12pm-5pm. She told me that  Phia will provide “fun, energizing exercise classes along with meditation classes, massage, polarity, and support groups.”  There will be loads of “activities for women such as day hikes, paint nights, craft parties, and ladies nights…Phia is for women from all walks of life, all ages, all body types, all backgrounds to come together, learn from each other, and be well.”

She also told me which translation for Phia has meaning for this new venture. Any guesses? Congratulations Laura and Phia!

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Pink House…a puddle’s view

I’m always looking for different ways to photograph the same old view and sometimes dynamic weather and clouds, or finding something to frame the subject can help with changing the look of a scene.   Another way to change the scene is to change your perspective.      Getting down low and using the foreground is one of my favorite ways to make a scene interesting.   In this case it was a 2-3 foot wide puddle in the middle of a parking lot across from the Pink House.   With my camera sitting on the ground at the edge of the puddle, you can see the house and colors of the sunrise reflected.    So get out and get down low… because you’ll never look at a little puddle the same way again!

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Here are some outtakes below for some perspective of what you don’t see. (Note I took the large telephone pole out…it was annoying me lol!)

Gloucester in the Boston Globe and at the Oscars: a win for Pratty’s and Casey Affleck for Manchester by the Sea

Meg Montagnino-Jarrett great job working with the filmmakers!

Pratty’s CAV bar

Kevin Cullen Boston Globe article.

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Another location from the film and winter, winter, winter

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Dec 19 2016

Delightful illustration course at Rocky Neck Cultural Center: award winning children’s book author illustrator, fine artist and Film Animator ANNA VOJTECH

What an opportunity to learn from someone in the top of the field! Tuesdays with Anna Vojtech begin March 28th (new dates announced)  March 14th and continues weekly through May 2.
Anna Vojtech is a fine artist and an award winning children’s book illustrator and writer living in Gloucester. She grew up in Prague, Czechoslovakia, what is now the Czech Republic. She studied art and film animation at the Art Academy in Prague, in Antwerp, Belgium, and in Hamburg, Germany. 
In 1971 Anna moved with her husband to Canada where she worked at the National Filmboard and for various film companies in Montreal. Her work in film animation led her to children’s book illustration.
Since 1979 Anna has worked with major publishing houses (“The First Strawberries” by Joseph Bruchac, Dial/Penguin, “Tough Beginnings” by Marylin Singer, Henry Holt & Co, “Over in the Meadow” by Olive Wadsworth, North-South Books (now Simon & Schuster), “Ten Flashing Fireflies” by Philemon Sturges,  and many others).
She became also known for her stunning botanical paintings, published by Crown Publishers as “Wild Flowers for All Seasons”.
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For the last 18 years Anna has been living with her family in Gloucester, painting and illustrating in her Cripple Cove Studio. She is happy to live on Cape Ann and to share her life and art with the community. 
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Pet of the week- Taylor


Did you say you were looking for a love muffin? How about a furry handsome hunk of a feline? Well are you in luck! I am a sweet and affectionate boy and ready to find my fur-ever love. I am considered a special needs adoption. When I was found abandoned outdoors alone I was in some serious distress and after a trip to the veterinarian it was discovered I had a urinary blockage. After some emergency medical care including a PU surgery the veterinarians say a diet of special food should prevent me from having blockages in the future. I am happy to say I have recovered and I am doing well. I will always need to be fed a prescription diet to avoid building up crystals in my urine and may need more care than some of my feline counter parts but I can also bring a lot to the table. I am fun to be with, have a natural ability to listen and improve your mood, lower your blood pressure and generally help you feel loved and needed. What more could you be looking for! To see all of the available animals at the Christopher Cutler Rich Animal Shelter please go to our website: capeannanimalaid.org.

Help Wanted: Gloucester Research Project

Cape Ann Community

Dear Good Morning Gloucester Community,

I am an author in Gloucester and the president of the League of Women Voters of Cape Ann. I have just finished my first book about a suffragist/mountain climber/author named Annie Smith Peck published by St. Martin’s Press (https://www.amazon.com/Womans-Place-Top-Biography-Climbers/dp/1250084008).

Now, I am on to my next project about the League of Women Voters. For this, I need your help. I am starting with a history of the league in Gloucester and am trying to find any connections that you may know of to the following women who were in the league during the 1950s. If you have any information about the following women, I would appreciate it if you could contact me at Hannah.s.kimberley@gmail.com. Any information at all is welcome. I’d love to be able to highlight the history of the women in our community on a national stage. Many thanks in advance.

Elizabeth Day…

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