Gloucester in the news and on the road: #GloucesterMA documentary and food a hit in Minnesota news

Great read- From Sea to Sustainable Sea: Supporting American Wild Seafood event in Minneapolis “combined midwest premiere of the Gloucester fishing documentary “Dead in the Water” by Rockport native David Wittkower sandwiched between a cocktail hour and a seafoot featst featuring Gloucester landed monkfish, redfish, crabs, lobsters andother seafood delights.” See who’s involved with this great road foodiefilm trip, read more here

Spreading Gloucester’s Story: Minnesotans eat up film on fleet, seafood by Sean Horgan, Gloucester Daily Times

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Today’s paper: Sean Horgan features Captain Joe & Sons in lobster news – Gloucester, Massachusetts throw the claw down!

“Building on the success of its Gloucester Fresh seafood branding campaign, the city of Gloucester plans to apply the same formula to help brand and market Massachusetts lobster to lobster lovers the world over. Couldn’t happen in a better place.”- Sean Horgan

Link to article in today’s Gloucester Daily Times by Sean Horgan with photos by Mike Springerand lots of lobster numbers “Gloucester hopes catch can claw its way to top: Push on to brand, market Massachusetts Lobster”¬†

Horgan wrote about the Seaport Economic Council¬† award announcements August 15th, City Wins $110,000 promote its fish, lobster¬†¬†“We’re really excited about the attention the program is getting,” said Sal Di Stefano, the city’s economic development director and its point man on the Gloucester Fresh campaign. “This was just a concept a few years ago and now it’s an internationally recognized brand. We’re really proud of that.”

 

Gloucester Daily Times Sean Horgan article Aug 18 2018 on lobster MA marketing campaign features Capt Joe & Sons.jpg

Great Public Works then and now | Haskell‚Äôs Pond Dam 2018 reconstruction with 1902 construction plans & wild origin story #GloucesterMA

Last month I was fortunate to glimpse the impressive Haskell’s Pond Dam reconstruction orchestrated by Gloucester’s Department of Public Works (DPW). Protecting and managing water utilities can be easy to take for granted. “This not so sleepy dam by Rt. 128 continues to deliver almost 30% of the city’s water,” exclaimed Larry Durkin, City Environmental Engineer. He explained that years ago the DPW team began assessing the city’s water infrastructure and compliance requirements including what would happen during an event storm. Haskell’s Pond Dam needed attention: The reconstruction was projected to cost 2 million (based on the preliminary plans and the recent Babson Reservoir repair). Phase I and II¬† were contracted out to SumCo Eco Contracting and the estimates were correct. The project cost two million and the work is largely completed thanks to grants and loans from the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy & Environmental Affairs (EEA), and the Commonwealth’s Dam and Seawall Program.¬† DPW Director, Mike Hale, and Larry Durkin concur: “They are fabulous to work with.” Discovery was anticipated. While drilling it was determined that the Haskell Pond Dam was indeed not structurally stable, and a MAJOR fix would be required to bring the dam into compliance. The DPW team is working with the state to fund the critical work of Phase 3.

Until then, take time to enjoy its history. While checking out the 2018¬† progress, I pulled stories and stats from the Haskell’s Pond Dam original build In 1902. As with today, the dam work was regarded¬† a model project. State assistance and contracted elements were required then, too. The numerous links among these two century projects are a fascinating delve and described below. The evolving breaking news in 1902 kicked off with a bang, surprising lawsuits (next stop for one could be Supreme Court), and deft leadership. Readers and history buffs will recognize names. (Tarr ancestors were involved; were yours?)

panorama and contemporary photos¬†– Like a mini Walden pond- Haskell’s Pond during Dam reconstruction Gloucester, MA ¬©c ryan July 7, 2018.¬†¬†

2018 July 2 Haskells Pond Dam reconstruction Gloucester Massachusetts Department of Public Works directing SumCo_ photograph ©c ryan (1)

FAST STATS 2018 Phase 1 & 2 Р$1,928,000

Scope for Phase 1 & 2: Construction of a new concrete spillway chute, concrete repairs, clearing of trees and unwanted vegetation and valve replacement at an earthen embankment dam within the City‚Äôs active water supply system, and more¬†(A prior $175,000 grant from the state‚Äôs Dam and Seawall Program was awarded to support ‚Äúengineering, permitting and the development of construction documents‚Ä̬† which established scope for Phase 1)

2018 July 2 Haskells Pond Dam reconstruction Gloucester Massachusetts Department of Public Works directing SumCo_ photograph ©c ryan (7)

Contractor: SumCo Eco Contracting,
Status: largely completed
Mayor: Mayor Romeo Theken
DPW Director: Mike Hale
City Environmental Engineer: Lawrence A. Durkin, P.E.
Project start (historic): 1902
Modern project start: 2013-18; RFP for Phase I issued: March 15, 2017
Total project cost: estimated to be $7 million
Funding Awarded to date: $1,925,000 

  • from State:¬†$1,925,000 – The City has done very well with Grants and Loans from the MA Executive Office of Energy & Environmental Affairs (EEA), and its Dam and Seawall Program, Mike Hale and Larry Durkin concur. “They are fabulous to work with.”
No EEA Grant Loan Comment
1 Design  & permitting grant FY 2016 $175,000 Completed 6/30/16
2 Haskell Phase 1 Construction Grant FY 2017 $500,000 Closed 6/30/17 and City reimbursed
3 Haskell Phase 1 Construction Loan FY 2018 $500,000 Submission by DPW to EEA 7/26/18 for reimbursement
4 Haskell Phase 2 Construction Grant FY 2018 (Applied to Phase 1 change orders) $500,000 Submission by DPW to EEA 7/26/18 for reimbursement
5 Additional FY 2018 EEA, funds applied to Phase 1 change orders $250,000 Submission by DPW to EEA 7/26/18 for reimbursement
6 Haskell Phase 2 Full FY 2019 Grant, to be applied to Phase 3 $500,000 to be realized if Phase 3 goes forward in FY 2019
7 EEA Total to date $1,925,000 $500,000

Phase 3:¬† Some future phase was anticipated, though obviously¬†impossible to nail down until Phase 1 & 2 were completed. The reconstruction was based on discovery put into works five or more years ago as Durkin and DPW team assessed city’s watersheds. The dam has been deemed unstable and will require a major fix to be compliant. According to Durkin, the scope for Phase 3 will include¬†“a secant concrete wall to be drilled and concrete along the dam crest for its entire length, cored in the bedrock beneath dam for structural stability and a concrete parapet wall tied into the secant wall that provides the necessary containment for the maximum storm as defined by the state”¬†and some exicting ancillary projects I’ll write more about in a future update. Phase 3 is estimated to cost 5 million and DPW is working on grants with the state to ensure that it happens.

Location(s): West Gloucester
Priority:¬† Mayor Romeo Theken’s Office-City consider water highest priority – this one continues to provide 1/3 of the city‚Äôs water

Before / After

before photos courtesy DPW ca.2014  /  after photos ©c ryan 2018

 

 

ORIGINAL 1902 PLANS AND PROPOSAL

Plate 14 West Gloucester showing Haskell's Pond_from Gloucester MA Dept Public Works archives

Reviewing the ordeal that was constructing the dam– one hundred and six years ago –is a fascinating read, and helped me appreciate the major job it’s been in 2018.¬†The original dam construction was contentious and hence the top news story of 1902 and years prior. While researching its beginnings, I was struck by just how many areas of concern and themes of city governance from 1902 remain relevant in 2018. Here‚Äôs a short list: the financial condition of the city (‚Äúrevaluation‚ÄĚ), suitable allocations, considering work on Rogers Street, water costs, heroic solo sails, possible steel bridge over Annisquam, Burnham Field play ground, pros and cons of tourism, disagreement over what is considered sound development, new theater on Main Street, announcing state grants, eminent domain, boundary lines, Gloucester Fresh, cut bridge in bad condition, aiming to keep work in town when possible, Stage Fort Park tributes, environmentally friendly innovations,¬† sustainability, access and oodles of local politics-¬† Office of Mayor and City Council, city staff, committees, and commissions.

The excerpts below pertain to Haskell’s pond dam from 1902 Gloucester Daily Times  archives that I pulled from reels at Sawyer Free and transcribed for easy access.  Plans and maps are courtesy of Mike Hale and the Department Public Work team. Links to high resolution versions are provided at the end of the post.

January 4, 1902 – MAYOR FRENCH LOSES: Aldermen Vote to Exonerate Water Commissioners

Continue reading “Great Public Works then and now | Haskell‚Äôs Pond Dam 2018 reconstruction with 1902 construction plans & wild origin story #GloucesterMA”

Buoy Pop Bananas

Clean streets and fun signs on a Main Street curve in historic downtown Gloucester.

Pop Gallery¬†and Buoy pop up store “Buoys will be Buoys”

Bananas  destination vintage shop for four decades

downtown shops Gloucester signs_Pop Gallery, Buoy, Bananas_20180720_©c ryan.jpg

 

Across the street Trio’s new window sign heralds Fresh Seafood from Local Boats.

Trio Gloucester Mass_ 20180720.jpg

Boston Globe focus on farm & sea to table | Gloucester’s Cape Ann Fresh Catch

Today’s Boston Globe: Meat and Seafood Supporters Tap Into Community Support by Johanna Seltz

features Gloucester CSA CAPE ANN FRESH CATCH: http://www.capeannfreshcatch.org/

“which started in conjunction with the Gloucester Fisherman’s Wives Association in 2008 and has about 400 people signed up for the current season…Recent species include…”

“Marshall gets her fish from about a dozen Gloucester fishing boats, and every CSA package includes a note with the name of the boat that caught the contents…”¬†

Boston Globe Cape Ann Fresh Catch Sept 17

Gloucester Lobster for Chef Kyle McClelland Great American Seafood Cook Off 2017

Since 2004, Competing chefs from all across the country battle to win the annual Great American Seafood Cook-Off.  Only one chef for any state is selected to compete and they must serve up native fare. Chef Lionel Uddipa of Salt from Juneau Alaska brought home the King of American Seafood Cook Off 2017 crown with an Alaskan king crab dish.

Chef Kyle McClelland of Saltie Girl Restaurant, Boston, MA¬†was runner up with “his dish of Modern New England Clambake with Gloucester Lobster and Corn Puree.”

GLOUCESTER FRESH SEAFOOD 

from the Great American Seafood Cook Off site:

chef Saltie Girl

Competing chefs:

Chef Brody Olive, Alabama (Voyager’s Restaurant at Perdido Beach Resort)

Chef Lionel Uddipa, Alaska (SALT)

Chef Jason Perry, Florida (The Fish House)

Chef Ryan Nelson, Indiana (Late Harvest)

Chef Bonnie Breaux, Louisiana (The St. John Restaurant)

Chef Kyle McClelland, Massachusetts (Saltie Girl)

Chef David Dickensauge, Mississippi (Corks & Cleaver Wine Bistro)

Chef Amber DiGiovanni, Missouri (Cookbook author and culinary teacher)

Chef Jay Smith, New Hampshire (Copper Door)

Chef Marc Quinones, New Mexico (MAS Tapas y Vino)

Chef Jennifer Behm-Lazzarini, Rhode Island (Red Fin Crudo + Kitchen and MasterChef winner)

Chef Ryan Coffindaffer, South Carolina (The Alisa Pub)

Chef Joe Cervantez, Texas (Brennan’s of Houston)

Gloucester Fresh campaign attracts international businesses

Boston Globe

March 23, 2017

By Dave Rattigan

The city‚Äės Gloucester Fresh initiative had a big week, with a major promotional event and the announcement of a $13,000 grant award. It hosted more than 70 guests ‚ÄĒ including businesses from Indonesia, the United Kingdom, Malaysia, Mexico, and Iceland ‚ÄĒ at a tasting reception at Seafood Expo North America in Boston. The three-day expo, which ended Tuesday, attracted about 100 new business leads, according to a prepared statement from organizers. Also this week, Gloucester learned it would receive $13,000 from the state Division of Marine Fisheries‚Äô Seafood Marketing pilot grant program. ‚ÄúIf you are looking for fresh seafood, the quality that comes off our boats is 100 percent,‚ÄĚ said Mayor Sefatia Romeo Theken, who spoke at the reception and ran a cooking demonstration with Angela Sanfilippo of the Gloucester Fishermen‚Äôs Wives Association.

Mayor Sefatia and Gloucester Fishermen’s Wives Association Angela¬†Sanffilippo provide and update to the Seafood North America Expo delegation on the seafood opportunities in Gloucester.