Boston Globe Memorial Day 1927: Coast Guard seaplanes circled and scattered flowers to honor WWI fallen airmen Maxwell Parsons and Eric Adrian Lingard #GloucesterMA Harbor

The Boston Globe included Gloucester among its beautiful Memorial Day roundup in 1927. Inspired by Gloucester’s annual Fishermen’s Memorial service, a new addition was incorporated into Gloucester’s Memorial Day observances that year. Perhaps this gesture could return for future programs.

“Airplanes Strew Flowers Over Gloucester Harbor”

“This maritime place which some time ago adopted the custom of strewing the waves at an annual (Gloucester Fishermen’s) memorial service inaugurated another feature today.     

“During the exercises at the Cut Bridge, in honor of the Naval dead, two seaplanes from Coast Guard Base 7 commanded by Commander Carl C. Von Paulson and Ensign Leonard A. Melka, circled over the outer harbor strewing flowers.     

“Gloucester lost two airman during the WWI, Ensign Eric Adrian Lingard and 2d Liet. Maxwell Parsons.      “Members of the G.A.R. Spanish War Veterans, Legion, and auxiliaries proceeded to Oak Grove Cemetery this morning where exercises were held after which the veterans moved to the Cut Bridge. Details from the servicemen’s posts had previously decorated the graves with flowers and foliage. The main exercises were held this afternoon in City hall auditorium, which was filled to its capacity…”

Boston Globe, May 31, 1927

In 1937, the Gloucester Playground Commission dedicated the Maxwell Parsons Playground in East Gloucester, the neighborhood of his youth:

Named in Honor of

Lieut. Arthur Maxwell Parsons

U.S. Flying Corp

Born Dec. 11, 1895

Died July 3, 1918

Inscription on the tribute plaque

Eric Adrian Lingard

Have you watched Atlantic Crossing on PBS Masterpiece?

Local airman, Eric Adrian Lingard, was part of a daring and brave crew that drove a German U-Boat from the shores of his home state during the July 21, 1918 attack on Orleans, off Nauset Beach.

In 2012, Fred Bodin shared this dynamite photo with Good Morning Gloucester

Lingard Seaplane 1919 Gloucester Harbor – one he had flown

“On October 18th, 1918, Lingard’s plane went down in heavy seas due to engine failure, and he died of pneumonia 11 days later. The Lingard home is diagonally across Washington Street from the Annisquam Church, and was later the home of the renowned Crouse family (Sound of Music lyrics and actress Lindsey Crouse).”

Fredrik D. Bodin, Good Morning Gloucester, 2012

After suffering more than a day in rough seas off Cape Cod, all the while assisting another brother in arms, Lingard and others were rescued from the frigid deep. Later, he succumbed from pneumonia exposure [and/or 1918 flu epidemic, still present that late. For example, the “two brothers who co-founded the Dodge Bros. automobile manufacturing company contracted the flu in New York in 1919: John died at the Ritz hotel in January 1920, and Horace in December 1920 after a wicked year battling its complications.” Search “Notables- Flu Cases and the Arts” Influenza Epidemic 1918 of Gloucester]

Open space in Annisquam, Soldiers’ Memorial Woods, was given by Lingard’s sister, Olga, his sole family member.

NAME: Annisquam Soldiers Memorial Wood
LOCATION: Washington Street, along Lobster Cove
CAMPAIGN: World War I
TYPE: Bronze tablet in granite stone
DATE DEDICATED: July 7, 1929
INSCRIPTION:
Annisquam
Soldiers Memorial Wood
In grateful remembrance of
John Ernest Gossom
Eric C. Lingard
Bertram Williams
who gave their lives for their country
in the World War

-from Gloucester, Ma. Archives Committee

Lingard’s name can be found WWI | Harvard Memorial Church

Where is the hull of Seaplane HS 1695, decommissioned by then Sect. State FDR to Gloucester’s park commission? GMG reader Bill Hubbard commented on Bodin’s photo, surmising:

“Nice old photo, Fred. For years before and during WW-II, the hull of a similar plane was in the lower level of the Twin Light Garage on East Main Street. The garage was owned by the late Ray Bradly who lived on Rocky Neck. As kids, we often played around it and I remember Ray telling us that it had been a WW-I airplane – I believe it was an old Coast Guard bi-winged seaplane. There were no wings or rudder, just the hull which was shaped very much like the one in the picture. Not long after the end of the war, they dragged it out to the flats on Smith Cove and burned it.”

Bill Hubbard, GMG reader comment reply to Fred Bodin, 2012

Fred Buck selected Joan of Arc photographs from the Cape Ann Museum for the HarborWalk Joan of Arc marker. We liked this one. The parade retinue includes a truck carrying wreckage from Lingard’s plane.

Joan of Arc in Legion Square. photog. unknown. date unknown. Lingard’s plane.

Union Congregational Church, Magnolia joins bell ringing in unison Easter Sunday at 10am

Susan Dalton shares a vintage postcard image and message from Magnolia that

 

 

Dierdre Savage’s message of the bells was shared. Pastor Abram Kielsmeir-Jones confirmed that the Union Congregational Church, Magnolia will particpate in the bell ringing event 10AM Easter Sunday.

Like Dierdre, Susan explains that she’s originally from New York and “wanted to mention that Magnolia’s Union Congregational Church was missing from the group of photos on your GMG Post.” She lives near that “sweet church” which completed a “recent re-shingling project on their vestry.” Thank you, Susan, for this happy update which also gives me a chance to underscore that the first post included some places of worship in Gloucester, not all. Enjoy photographs of a few more below.

Look forward to hearing the ringing of the bells which is an international effort now. “Tuscany and beyond!”

 

Lobster Cove: Gloucester DPW rebuilding stone wall along Washington Street / 127 (and brush clearing at Bennett)

Brett Chelsea and John_Gloucester DPW stone wall repair Lobster Cove_ Washington Street_Rt 127_20191009_© c Ryan.jpg
Brett, John, Chelsea – DPW crew covers their masonry work in progress on the stone wall by Lobster Cove October 9, 2019, ahead of a forecast nor’easter, Gloucester, Mass.

CAUTION- slow down!

Gloucester DPW crews are restoring the old stone fence along Washington Street/Rt 127 between the Annisquam footbridge and Annisquam Church. They are filling and resetting capstone and top stone along its length and attending to areas of greater disrepair. The fence on this route has been hit by cars more than once. Estimates for contracting the work went far outside the department’s budget. Thankfully, Gloucester DPW is up to the city maintenance of a traditional public works build.  They began the job last week (see below)

BEFORE (and one in process/mortar)

 

AFTER

So far- Gloucester DPW is just a fraction of the way into this project. They’ll tackle sections at a time.

Gloucester DPW repairing capstone and topstone by Lobster Cove Gloucester MA_20191009_©c ryan (2)

Gloucester DPW repairing capstone and topstone by Lobster Cove Gloucester MA_20191009_©c ryan (1)

Goose Cove

Gloucester DPW repaired the stone wall at Goose Cove (also hit)

Gloucester DPW stone wall repairs Goose Cove Bridge _20191009_© c ryan.jpg

Nearby another DPW crew completed much needed roadside overgrowth clearing on Bennett Street up towards Dennison Street

Before (Google Street view) / After

 

HUNDREDS OF SQUID WASHED ASHORE AT LIGHTHOUSE BEACH IN ANNISQUAM

Friends Bobbi and Pete Kovner sent in the snapshots from this morning. I didn’t go over to see because Bobbi reported back that the seagulls were eating the squid.

The photos show just a portion of the beach, there were actually much more.

Does anyone have an idea as to why there were so many squid at Lighthouse Beach. Thank you so much for writing if you do!

SENDING LOVE AND PRAYERS TO THE HANK JUNKER FAMILY

Sending much love and all our prayers to Judy, Marissa, Alexis and all the Junkers for the loss of their beloved husband and grandfather.

Henry “Hank” Juncker III

October 06, 1933 – October 11, 2018

Gloucester, MA – Henry Juncker, III, 85, beloved husband, father, grandfather, and great-grandfather, passed away on Thursday, October 11, at the Wolfeboro Bay Center, in Wolfeboro, N.H.
He was born in the Bronx, New York City, N.Y. to the late Henry Juncker, Jr. and Elna (Christensen) Juncker. Hank attended New York Public schools, graduating from Stuyvesant High School, and then studied at Brown University on a NROTC scholarship. It was there that he met his future wife Judy, a student at Pembroke College; they would marry in 1958.
Upon graduation from Brown in 1955, Ensign Juncker (USNR) deployed for cruises in the Mediterranean and Caribbean Seas, serving on the ammunition ship USS Great Sitkin (AE-17) as a gunnery and deck officer. He was honorably discharged from active service in 1957, with the rank of LT. (j.g.), and continued in reserve service thru 1960.
Following his service, Henry pursued graduate studies at Columbia University, earning a master’s degree in Education. His first teaching position was at Lakeland High School in upstate New York, where he and Judy discovered they missed the ocean, so he applied for several positions closer to the coast. He eventually interviewed with Paul Walsh from Marblehead Public Schools, who hired him to teach in Marblehead, Mass., where he would serve in multiple roles for 50+ years. Henry retired in 2014 as a highly respected educator, teaching and mentoring students and younger colleagues alike.
Henry was an active member of the Annisquam Village Church, serving many years as clerk, teaching Sunday school, and singing in the choir. He was also a long time member of the Chorus North Shore.
Hank is survived by his wife of 60 years, Judith, and the family was blessed earlier this summer to have been able to celebrate that union while he was still well. He is also survived by three children (Kristian, Sr. and his wife Cindy; Deene and his wife Jennifer Jensen; Betsy and her husband Karl Bujold); six grandchildren (Kristian, Jr. and his wife Jessica; Courtney Tranos; Arrienne Andrus and her husband Sean; Erik and his wife Vicki; Alexis DiGregorio; Marisa DiGregorio), and six great-grandchildren (Michael Johnson; Christopher Tranos Jr; Elias Tranos; Declan Andrus; Keelin Andrus; Claire Juncker). In addition, Henry is survived by his younger sister Elna Hickson and her husband Lloyd of Milwaukee, Wisconsin.In keeping with his wishes there is no funeral, but all are invited to a celebration of Henry’s life at 2 p.m. on Saturday, November 17 at the Annisquam Village Church, 820 Washington St, in Gloucester. Family and friends are cordially invited to a reception at the Annisquam Village Hall directly after the service.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent in his memory to Marblehead Dollars for Scholars, PO Box 4, Marblehead, MA 01945.

1959 Lyman boat for sale calls forth irresistible young adult book, Driftwood Captain, by Paul B Kenyon

1959 Lyman boat for sale_20180917_Gloucester Mass ©Catherine Ryan (4).jpg

Scroll down for more photos of the boat that’s for sale which had me remembering a great read. Excerpted quotes are from the superb young adult book, Driftwood Captain, from 1956 by Paul B Kenyon, a writer and Gloucester Daily Times columnist and editor, with illustrations by Louise Kenyon, folly cove artist. The book is dedicated to their sons.  I guarantee explorers young and old will be inspired to seek treasure and adventure all about them and persist. Kids you know will want to befriend characters so real they jump off the page and grab your heart. Sometimes authors get in the way of their own writing, especially with children’s books, trying too hard and overwriting the kid’s perspective. Not Kenyon. Boy is he a timeless ease. You can find the book at Cape Ann Museum and local book stores.

“…But Pete had the faith of a twelve-year-old in his sailing skill and in his flighty boat, a hunk of a fisherman’s dory. He had been sailing in Lobster Cove since he graduated from floating logs. He knew the breezes and currents and even the ways that certain boats swung at each other. He would put on dark glasses to shield his eyes from the angry glare of visiting yachtsmen, and sail close to the boats of his customers so that he could toss folded newspapers into cockpits and cabins. He was a seagoing paperboy…

“He’d rather have the old hull lying on shore, tied to a tree just above the bridge. He liked her rugged looks and her air of being what Gloucester men called “able.”

“The old hull reminded Pete of the famous sloop Spray, Captain Joshua Slocum rebuilt the Spray, timber by timber and sailed her around the world singlehanded, after he finished fitting out at Gloucester. The Spray was thirty six feet long, not counting her bowsprit. She had a lot of room for a boat of her length. So had the hold hull that had lain unused for years. That’s where Pete had begun the daydream that had led to the Hunkadory-Harbor-Queen argument. Pete wondered why his family did not share his fondness for the hull. Pappy Leonard talked a lot about getting a boat big enough for cruising along the coast.

Here was a boat in the rough, just the right size…” 

 

1959 Lyman boat for sale as is, dry dock @ Shaw’s shopping center, Gloucester, Mass,

 

the old hull_LOUISE KENYON_stellar linocut illustrations for Driftwood Captain by Paul B Kenyon 1956butch Petes dog_LOUISE KENYON_stellar linocut illustrations for Driftwood Captain by Paul B Kenyon 1956