Ocean Beauty: Gloucester Sea-Life Viewed from Under Water Video From Eric Swanson

30 minute underwater video of Gloucester sea-life: Dolphin, Stripers, Menhaden, Mackerel, Mako Shark, Basking Shark, Halibut, Summer Flounder, Winter Flounder, Sea Robin, Red Fish, Dog Fish, Skates, Silver Hake, Red Hake, Herring, Pollock, Haddock, Cod, Cunner, Squid, American Eel, Sand Eels, Ocean Sunfish, Silversides, Starfish, Giant Poisonous Jellyfish, Seals, Lobster, Spider Crab, Horseshoe Crab, Sand Dollars, Sea Urchins, Sea Scallops, Quahogs, Mussels, Surf Clams, Whelks, Moon Snails, Sea Anemone, Coral, Sponges, and more.

TWO TERRIFIC WILDLIFE PRESENTATIONS UPCOMING AT SALEM STATE UNIRVERSITY

JENNIFER JACKMAN SHARES THE FOLLOWING:

NOTE CHANGE OF DATE AND PLACE: On December 3, from 2:30-3:50pm at Veteran’s Hall B, Ellison Campus Center (place to be determined) Salem State University, Dr. Andrea Bogomoloni, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute and Chair of the Northwest Atlantic Seal Research Consortium will speak on “Seals & Society: Biology, Ecology and Interactions in New England.” Her talk will review the history of seals in New England, examine their roles in the ecosystem and as ocean health sentinels, and discuss seal-fishery interactions.

Harbor Seal Gloucester

On Monday, November 19, from 2:30-3:50pm in Veteran’s Hall B, Ellison Campus Center, Salem State University, there will be a panel on “Wildlife in Peril.” Panelists include Andrea Zeren (Psychology) who will highlight the plight of elephants globally; Jack Clarke (Director of Public Policy and Government Relations, Mass Audubon) who will describe current threats to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and the Endangered Species Act; and Mendy Garron (NOAA) who will discuss the plight of large whale species (particularly right whales). All three speakers also will discuss efforts to protect wildlife.

Snowy Egrets are just one of myriad species of birds that have been saved from the brink of extinction by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and the Endangered Species Act.

These events are sponsored by the Salem State University Human Dimensions of Wildlife Unit at the Bates Center for Public Affairs and the Political Science Department and are open to the public. For more information contact, Jennifer Jackman at jjackman@salemstate.edu .

QUESTION FOR OUR MARINE BIOLOGY EXPERTS

Perhaps I am just imagining, but the seals that were at Brace Cove several mornings ago appear to have a much different pattern of spots on their coats than the Harbor Seals we typically see hauled out on the rocks. I know that Harp Seals are also seen in our area at this time of year and read that the juveniles molt in interesting patterns. The two pinnipeds on the far right have very large irregular patches and the seal on the left seemed half the size of the other three with an almost pointed snout. Is it a different species or a young seal I wonder? Looking at several sources to id and I am still puzzled. Would love to hear from our readers. Thank you so much!

Seals brace Cove Gloucester www.kimsmithdesigns.com