THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF WILDFLOWERS

Reader Robert Millman sent photos and wrote the following question:

I am new to Gloucester, having bought a home two years ago.

As we were clearing some down trees and brush, we came upon a small stand on what I think are Monotropa, related to Indian Pipes, but do not look like any other pictures I have found.  Corliss and another local nursery were not able to provide anything further information.

Can you ask your readers or do you have any suggestions of who I could reach out to?

Thank you

Hello Robert,

Your beautiful clumps of wildflowers are the North American native One-flowered Broom-rape (Orobanche uniflora); also called Naked Broomrape. I can see why you thought it was related to Indian Pipe (Monotropa uniflora), or Ghost Plant. Neither grows green leaves and both produce single flowers, typically seen growing in bunches.
Indian Pipes photo courtesy wikicommons media
Like Indian Pipes, it is a parasitic plant, which means it does not produce chlorophyll, or green tissue, deriving nutrients by attaching its roots to neighboring plants.
One-flowered Broom-rape photos submitted by Robert Millman
There are over 200 species Orobanche. Host plants for One-flowered Broom-Rapes include species of sunflowers, goldenrods, and sedums. 
Aside from white, Naked Broomrape also flowers in lavender and yellow.
The stems of Sporchia (Orbanche crenata), a species parasitic on the fava bean, are gathered and eaten in the region of Apilia, in southern Italy. Image courtesy wikicommons media.

 

Visitors from Rhode Island

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A very loving family who now live in Cranston Rhode Island, but originally lived in Brooklyn New York.  We spoke at length about the Italian history in Gloucester.  She was very out spoken and said she is in a mixed marriage, she is Sicilian and he is from mainland Italy. They were headed on a whale watch at Seven Seas.  A wonderful encounter from a very colorful family.

CIAO FROM SUNNY CINQUE TERRE ITALY!

With the rainy weather and chilly temperatures we’ve been having of late, I thought readers would like to see some snapshots from our daughter Liv’s wonderful trip to Italy. One of her best friends from college, Natalie, is getting married this weekend in Florence. For a pre-wedding adventure, Liv has been staying in the beautiful village of Manarola,  located on the Italian Riviera. Manarola is one of five fishing and wine producing towns that make up Cinque Terre (“Five Lands”) in the Province of La Spezia. The photos are from Manarola and the village of Monterosso.

Cinque Terre National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Paths, trains, and boats connect the villages; cars are not allowed. 

Liv is loving the local seafood. Aren’t these paper cone containers fantastic for fish-on-the-go?

Liv enjoys going to beaches where ever she travels and I’ve asked her to let us know how folks manage trash in remote villages by the sea, like Manarola and Monterosso. As you can see in the photos above, there are trash and recycling barrels along the beach, and lifeguards also pick up garbage left behind.

Chiesa di San Giovanni Battista, Monterosso al Mare

 

Cruise with Captain Hollywood from Wicked Tuna

IMG_8745Cruise with Captain Hollywood from Wicked Tuna, he is currently running Harbor Cruises out of Gloucester. 

Call (978)-290-6174.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Captain Bill Muniz “Hollywood” seen here with two local fishing captains and tourists from Italy.

Merluzzi- If the old timers were still alive they’d be having a field day.

Guys like Mickey Red, Leo The Flounder, they’d be going crazy for the whiting that’s been coming in.  Fried, in a broodu, you name it- Whiting, my favorite fish to eat.

Let the Menagani Babu eat 30 day old swordfish, I’ll eat a mess of fried whiting any day over that crap.

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When we were in Ravello, Italy we saw the Merluzzi at a Farmer’s Market. Same fish in the Mediterranean that we’re landing here in Gloucester.

Commercial Fishing: Rome

Apparently commercial fishing in Rome is alive and well.  In my opinion you can tell how well the boats are doing by how well they are maintained.  These boats are all in good shape and devoid (mostly) of rust so they must be doing alright.

Click below to see the photos

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