Gloucester author in the field: Deborah Cramer on a shorebird story of the century featured in the New York Times #LetsGoDeveaux

Still from video [Matt Aeberhard and Andy Johnson Cornell Lab of Ornithology] accompanying interactive feature for NY Times [graphics by Gus Wezerek, design by Ana Becker], written by Deborah Cramer

“AFTER THE 2014 DISCOVERY, Ms. Sanders returned to the bank again and again over the next few years. She determined that when twilight and spring’s highest tides coincided, whimbrels began arriving on the island en masse. In May 2019, she assembled a team to count the birds. They began late one afternoon as the sun was setting. Long lines of whimbrels streamed onto Deveaux, the flocks extending as far up the river and south over the ocean as they could see. When darkness halted their work, they still heard the murmuring calls and rustling wings of incoming birds. On a night when a clear sky and a nearly full moon bathed the island in light, they counted 20,000 birds — half of the entire Atlantic population.

To understand why so many whimbrels gather on Deveaux and what makes the island vital to their migration, the scientists needed to know where the birds went during the day and how they used the island at night.’

Deborah Cramer, New York Times
Fantastic interactive journalism featuring shorebird discovery in South Carolina

New York Times article here

Videos accompanying interactive NY Times feature by Matt Aeberhard and Andy Johnson / Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Author Deborah Cramer

Resides and works in Gloucester, Ma.

Visiting Scholar, Environmental Solutions Initiative – MIT

Great Waters: An Atlantic Passage (W.W. Norton)

Smithsonian Ocean: Our Water Our World (Harper Collins/Smithsonian Books)

The Narrow Edge: A Tiny Bird, an Ancient Crab, and an Epic Journey  (Yale University Press) 

  •      National Academy of Sciences Best Book
  •      Society of Environmental Journalists Rachel Carson Book Award
  •      Volando a Orillas del Mar: El viaje épico de un ave playera que une continentes  (Vázquez Mazzini, Buenos Aires)
  •     绝境 (Commercial Press, Beijing)

Visitors to Gloucester-197

Family from South Carolina at Mom’s Kitchen,and oldest daughter at Eastern Point, also Gentleman from Ecuador with his son-in-law on Main Street headed towards Lone gull. The family from South Carolina I met at breakfast at Mom’s and ran into the entire family again at Eastern Point, an absolute delightful family, great conversation.

Visitors from South Carolina and Michigan

DSC05346

Couple from South Carolina coming off a whale watch, heading towards Lat 43  Restaurant

 _2017_07_13_097417

Family from Michigan, the daughter was from Michigan State, but the father and I talked about football and  Tom Brady attending University of Michigan.   Thank you University of Michigan.

The Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge

Rick and went to our nephew’s wedding in Charleston, South Carolina, first let me say what a great city Charleston is. Very happy to be back in Gloucester though. Here is a photo of the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge. Does it look familiar?  I took this photo from the boat going out to Fort Sumter.  The small fort in the photo is called Castle Pinckney.
The Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge is a cable-stayed bridge over the Cooper River in South Carolina, connecting downtown Charleston to Mount Pleasant. The eight lane bridge satisfied the capacity of U.S. Route 17 when it opened in 2005 to replace two obsolete cantilever truss bridges. The bridge has a main span of 1,546 feet (471 m), the third longest among cable-stayed bridges in the Western Hemisphere. It was built using the design-build method and was designed by Parsons Brinckerhoff.
May 16, 2015 Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge