Nova Scotia’s Annual Tree on Boston Commons – fascinating history and ties!

Annual tree at Kent Circle in Gloucester, Mass., also from Nova Scotia.

Follow the excellent thread to learn more about Canada’s annual remembrance and giving tree; its history concerns a disaster as catastrophic as the Johnstown Flood.

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There are many Nova Scotia ties in Gloucester, too. Canadians immigrants, especially ones born on the east coast, settled throughout Massachuestts. Canadian born fishermen worked and lived in Gloucester. More than 1200 Nova Scotians went down to the sea and are memorialized here.

Thanks to the Tarr family, Gloucester has an annual tree from Nova Scotia. Read more about this year’s journey to install the tree from Shelburne Falls at Kent Circle.

Schooner Roseway

Schooner Roseway ©Kim Smith 2013

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While searching though my photo library, I discovered a batch of stills from the Schooner Festival that I have not yet posted because I was so intent on editing the Schooner Festival video. I’ll try to post them this weekend–if everyone hasn’t already had enough of schooner photos!

The Schooner Roseway is a National Historic Landmark, owned and operated by World Ocean School, which is located in Camden, Maine. She is a gaff-rigged schooner and was first launched from Essex in 1925.  The Roseway runs sails out of Boston during the summer and out of Savannah, Georgia and St. Croix during the winter months.

If you have sailed on the Schooner Roseway, I would love to know about your experience. Please leave a comment in the comment section. Thank you!

History of the Roseway from the World Ocean School website: 

In the fall of 1920 a Halifax, Nova Scotia, newspaper challenged the fisherman of Gloucester, Massachusetts, to a race between the Halifax fishing schooners and the Gloucester fleet. Therefore many schooners, such as Roseway, built at this time were not strictly designed for fishing but in order to protect American honor in the annual races.

Roseway, 137′ in sparred length, was designed as a fishing yacht by John James and built in 1925 in his family’s shipyard in Essex, Massachusetts. Father and son worked side by side on Roseway, carrying on a long New England history of wooden shipbuilding. She was commissioned by Harold Hathaway of Taunton, Massachusetts, and was named after an acquaintance of Hathaway’s “who always got her way.” Despite her limited fishing history, Roseway set a record of 74 swordfish caught in one day in 1934.

Read more about the history of the Roseway here