Iconic Edward Hopper SOLD for $700,000 at Sotheby’s- Gloucester Factory and House – bird’s eye view of Cripple Cove and Gorton’s smokehouse on E. Main St. (now Capt. Joe & Sons and GMG HQ) from Horchow collection #GloucesterMA

A classic Edward Hopper inspired by Gloucester will be sold at Sotheby’s auction this morning*. Architectural and natural elements in the drawing remain recognizable today. The scene overlooks the same house on East Main, Capt. Joe & Sons, and Cripple Cove (see then/now comparison photos below). The Gorton’s factory building there burned down. Cripple Cove playground is the green on the right of the Hopper image.

The drawing last changed hands in 1989 when the Horchows purchased the drawing from Kennedy Galleries in New York. Will it land in another private collection or an institution?

Edward Hopper (1882-1967), Gloucester Factory and House, 1924, watercolor and pencil on paper, 14″ x 20″, from the Carolyn & Roger Horchow collection (Dallas,TX) They purchased the drawing in 1989 from Kennedy Galleries, NYC.

Lot 8 estimate $800,000-$1,200,00 currently at $600,000 bid before the auction opens

*Update- With just 56 lots to sell and two withdrawn ahead of sale, Lot 8 came up quickly with a few competing bids and a hammer price of $700,000 ($867,000 with fees), below estimate.

Many lots before and after were short of estimate or passed (unsold) including a Winslow Homer watercolor which was “reoffered” by pausing the bidding on the final lot #56 to return to Lot #16 (which sold for 2 million hammer price) before moving back to the final lot, an Edward Willis Refield (which sold for $250,000). That whoopsie “reoffer” is highly unusual**. The auction house scrambled to bring that phone bidder forward before the close of the sale. A second Homer watercolor passed at 850,000.

The Sotheby’s December 11, 2020 auction offered a variety of American art from various collections. The sale results were a mixed bag of purchases, passes, and pulled works. Only one work sold far above estimate, thanks to a bidding war, a western scene by John F. Clymer. Scroll below the Hopper and Gloucester images to see the Homer.

above photo: Catherine Ryan

above: page from Edward Hopper all around Gloucester by Catherine Ryan, 2010

above: Sotheby’s catalogue entry page

In 2017, Christies sold a Rockefeller Hopper painting, Cape Ann Granite, also in December, which I wrote about here: Bring it Home.

**December 11, 2020 Winslow Homer Lot 16 sold at Sotheby’s after passing first in the live sale and then “Reoffered” before the close of sale. For both the first and second offer window, the bid opened at 1.8 million. In the first round the bidding went back and forth, but “passed” at 2.2 million, presumably failing to meet reserve or presale estimate (2.5 – 3.5 million). Before the final lot of the sale, the auctioneer annouced a “re-offer” for Lot 16 after the audio went silent for a brief time. The drawing was sold to a buyer placing a phone bid for 2 million hammer price (2,440,000 after fees), less than the “pass” of the first time through. This move is nearly an aftersale during the sale. Perhaps the first time around the buyer was late to the call or there was confusion determining the “up to” amount, factoring in the fees.

Property from a Prominent Private Collection

Winslow Homer

1836 – 1910

Two Girls on the Beach, Tynemouth

signed Winslow Homer and dated 1881 (lower left)

watercolor and pencil on paper

14 1/8 by 20 inches

Holiday Lights and Cocoa Drives 2020 map #GloucesterMA ūüöó‚ėēūü饂ú®‚õĄUpdate 5 – Magnolia, Centennial, Maplewood, Madison Ave., Wash., and more!

Awesome – Hope & Joy house vibe is visible on descent Centennial Drive to Blvd

This is the sixth and final in a series featuring Christmas lights on 200+ decorated homes throughout neighborhoods in Gloucester Massachusetts for the 2020 season. Festive displays range from draped garland lights & wrapped trees to elaborate tableaus. Gloucester is beautiful! Streets that are covered in this post:

  • Magnolia area of Gloucester including Magnolia Ave., Hesperus Ave., Western Ave., Linden Ave., Lowe Drive
  • downtown Gloucester blocks including: Centennial Drive, Maplewood Ave., Prospect St., Riverside Ave. block, Washington St., Gloucester Avenue, Mystic Avenue, Madison Avenue (w/ Madison Sq. and Ct., and Springfield St.)
  • neighborhood additions: nearby Elizabeth Road; Abbott Road; East Gloucester- Mt. Pleasant area and East Main; and West Gloucester – Essex Ave.

MAGNOLIA AREA

Downtown

CENTENNIAL DRIVE ADDITIONS

Abbott Road | East Gloucester additions

West Gloucester additions

Follow links to see scenes from other Gloucester neighborhoods (or follow through to the end of the post and look for/select page 1,2)

Holiday Lights and Cocoa Drives Gloucester Massachusetts map 2020. Photos have been added to the Google maps: tour by car or keyboard!

FAQ – how to print

The map is smart phone ready with house pictures. If you want to print the map see below: (1) navigate to the map page URL and (2) click on the three dots menu bar on the upper right. Pull down and select “print” PDF as of 12/7/2020

Updated

RECENT SIGHTINGS OF HECTOR, CAPE ANN’S VISITING BLACK VULTURE!

Over the weekend, many new of sightings of Hector, Gloucester and Rockport’s visiting Black Vulture, were reported. He was seen at residences all along East Main Street, back at the Rockport dump, and even in Rockport Harbor! Many thanks to reader Lauren T for sharing her photo.

Black Vulture “Hector” at Rockport Harbor

Please Don’t Weed the Milkweed

Common Milweed Asclepias syriaca ¬©Kim Smith 2014Once established, native Common Milkweed grows vigorously and rambunctiously, making itself known even in the thinnest of¬†sidewalk cracks. Here’s a patch growing along East Main Street. I think it beautiful! What do you think?

*    *    *

If you caught Tom Ashbrook’s On Point broadcast on NPR this morning you heard Doctor Lincoln¬†Brower, Karen Oberhausser,¬†and Rick Mikula, three of the world’s leading butterfly experts, speaking¬†about the disappearance of the Monarch and the main reason why–most notably because¬†of the sterilization of the American landscape¬†through the use Monsanto’s Roundup and GMO corn and¬†soybean crops. The episode is¬†airing again tonight¬†at 8pm.

The following is a list of a few suggestions on ways in which we can all help turn the tide:

Plant milkweed and wildflowers. Teach members of your family and friends what milkweed looks like and why we don’t want to weed it out of the garden. The above patch of milkweed is growing next to a shop on East Main Street. About a month ago, I went into the store¬†and, very,¬†very politely inquired as to whether or not they knew that the plant growing outside their doorway was a terrific patch of milkweed. They had no idea. I explained¬†what the benefits were to the Monarchs¬†and have since noticed¬†that¬†the milkweed patch is still¬†growing beautifully!

Ban GMO crops. Genetically modified seeds¬†have been altered to withstand megadoses of Roundup. Millions and millions of tons of herbicides are poured onto Roundup Ready fields of crops, preventing any other plant that has not been genetically altered from growing (in other words, wildflowers). The application of Monsanto’s deadly destructive herbicide Roundup is¬†creating¬†vast sterilized agricultural wastelands, which will, over time, only need heavier and heavier¬†does of their lethal¬†chemicals to continue to be viable.

Don’t apply herbicides and pesticides in your own gardens.

Create wildflower corridors in backyards and highways.

Reduce salt wherever possible¬†(and where it wouldn’t¬†cause harm¬†to human life). Large amounts of road salt, as was needed during this past snowiest of winters, is detrimental to wildlife habitats.

Something Different After The Rain- Indian Pipe Found on East Main Street From Kathy Chapman

Indian Pipe found on East Main street.

The dainty, extremely delicate flowers of the epiparasitic Indian pipe appear in the fall following a rain.

Kathy Chapman

IndianPipe

Here is some information about the Indian Pipe or Ghost Flower from www.uswildflowers.com

Wildflowers of the United States

Indian Pipe, Ghost Flower, Ghost Plant – Monotropa uniflora

When first seen, Indian Pipe seems more like a mushroom or other fungus than like a true flowering plant due to the color – or lack of color. However, it has a stem, bract-like scales in place of leaves, and a single flower at the end of the stem. 
Indian Pipe has roots through which it gathers its nourishment. The plant lacks chlorophyll but instead gets its nutrients through a mutually beneficial relationship with a fungus in the soil where it grows.

Source: http://uswildflowers.com/detail.php?SName=Monotropa%20uniflora